Friday, December 27, 2013

"And It Only Took Three Months"

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Think of a well-known filmmaker, first and last names, add "S-U-N" before this person's first name and last name. In each case, you'll form a common English word. Who is the filmmaker?
Here's the joke for this this blog's title. Ross has figured out how to watch TV through Amazon Prime. He started to download Ken Burns'--oh, right, that's the answer: SUNKEN SUNBURNS--documentary series on the national parks. The night before the puzzle, Ross finished the last episode and said, "I've watched my first Ken Burns' documentary."

Me: "And it only took three months."

No photos, as a year-end gesture for Mendo Jim. :-)

The explanation for the photos in Sunday's post is simple. Ken Burns' Wiki page mentions "Among places they called home were Saint-Véran, France [and] Newark, Delaware. I couldn't just plunk down photos of those two places. (I checked. If you Google those names, you get Ken Burns as the first entry.) But related photos seemed okay. So the top three are of that region of France, and the bottom three are of other places named Newark.

Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300 -- Joe Kupe
301 - 350
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450 -- Magdalen
451 - 500
 
501 - 550 -- Ross
551 - 600
601 - 650 -- Mendo Jim
651 - 700
701 - 750 -- Word Woman
751 - 800 
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000 -- Marie
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350 -- zeke creek
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900 -- Paul
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300 -- Maggie Strasser
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

1 comment:

David said...

I took your "No-Hinter" comment in the title as an allusion to a baseball no-hitter, Baseball being one of KB's documentary subjects.