Thursday, January 31, 2013

NPR Puzzle 1/27.13 - Segue to a Segway?

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name a personal mode of transportation. Remove its first and sixth letters. What remains — in sequence, without rearranging any letters — will spell the names of two parts of the human body. What are they?
The answer is WHEELCHAIR yielding HEEL and HAIR. I don't recall how we solved this, but I liked David's story about running behind his wife before he got it. Was he looking at the ground and saw her heels, or up at her head and saw her hair?

Sorry I'm several hours late posting this. I'm ::this:: close to being done with the draft of Book 2 of the Blackjack Quartet. In fact, as soon as I publish this I'm back to writing.

Very quickly, then, some photos:







Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500 -- EKW
 
501 - 550 -- Joe Kupe
551 - 600 -- Marie
601 - 650 -- Mendo Jim
651 - 700 -- Ross
701 - 750
751 - 800 -- Magdalen
801 - 850
851 - 900 -- Paul
901 - 950
951 - 1,000 -- Laura
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200 -- KDW
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 -- Curtis
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900 -- skydiveboy
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050 -- Word Woman
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

Sunday, January 27, 2013

NPR Puzzle 1/27/13 -- "Your Own Two Feet" is NOT the Answer!

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name a personal mode of transportation. Remove its first and sixth letters. What remains — in sequence, without rearranging any letters — will spell the names of two parts of the human body. What are they?
This took a bit of teamwork, despite the implication of a single person's mode of transportation.

You hardly need us to tell you that you should access NPR's personal form of contact and submission as soon as you know the answer.

We're all sick here at Casa Crosswords, so this will be a pared-down post. But even pared down, I've picked out some photos for your enjoyment.







Time for
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing.

There were over 450 entries for last week's GOLDA MEIR meets the EMIR puzzle, which means KDW won the right to pick between a puzzle book or a contribution to the Fairfield County Community Foundation. Get in touch, KDW, and let me know which prize you'd like.

And you--you can win either a puzzle book or the warm glow of satisfaction knowing you're a generous person. Either one will make you happy. Guess the range for this week's puzzle, and good luck!

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print). 

Thursday, January 24, 2013

NPR Puzzle 1/20/13 - The Three Generals Joke

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Take the last name of a famous world leader of the past. Rearrange its letters to name a type of world leader, like czar or prime minister. What world leader is it?
Ross got this as soon as I reminded him to consider the Middle East. Thus, we assume the correct answers are GOLDA MEIR and EMIR.

Here's the three generals joke. (My thanks to J-Weekly for reminding me of this one.)
Once, when Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir met with President Richard Nixon, he told her that he would trade any three American generals for Israeli General Moshe Dayan. “OK,” she said, “I’ll take General Motors, General Electric and General Dynamics.”
An oldie but goody.

All but one* of the photos from Sunday's blog post were generated by the extraordinary facts of Golda Meir's life. She was born in Kiev, but grew up in Milwaukee before living briefly in Denver. All wonderfully misleading cold weather locales. Thank you, Wikipedia!

*And the outlier? Meir went to North Division High School, but I suspect that no longer exists, so I "stole" a similarly-named high school, the former North West Division High School in Chicago (it's now called the Jose De Diego Community Center).

Here's some more appropriately Middle Eastern photos:

Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Nahal Dishon, Israel

Mt. Caramel, Israel

Mitzpe Yiftah, Israel

Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250 -- Joe Kupe
251 - 300 -- Laura
301 - 350
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450 -- Dave
451 - 500 -- KDW
 
501 - 550 -- Magdalen
551 - 600
601 - 650 -- Ross
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900 -- Paul
901 - 950 -- skydiveboy
951 - 1,000 -- Marie
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- EKW
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550 -- Mendo Jim
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

Sunday, January 20, 2013

NPR Puzzle 1/20/13 -- One Anagram To Lead Them All

I notice that Ross started his blog posts with actual, like, words and not my formulaic "Here's this week's NPR Puzzle." Hah! That's what you get when the substitute comes in!

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Take the last name of a famous world leader of the past. Rearrange its letters to name a type of world leader, like czar or prime minister. What world leader is it?
Ross says it's a tough puzzle, but that's because I had to say something to help him solve it. Me? I think it's pretty easy.

And you did too--admit it! You've already sent in your answer using NPR's highly stylized contact form here.

I'm back. Did you miss me? I bet not--Ross's blog posts are so interesting.

Hey, if you want a chuckle, go read the comments on Leslie Ann Sartor's blog regarding an excerpt of my book. Specifically, Vince's comment. Make sure you refill your coffee--he's written a tiny doctoral dissertation on an 800-word excerpt! Too funny.

Otherwise, I'm in deadline hell. Book Two of The Blackjack Quartet (yes, it has its own website) needs to be in my editor's hands in two weeks. Less than two weeks. So I have to blog fast and then write some words this morning!

Photos: One of these is misleading. Can you guess which one? Leave a comment with just the number of the photo.







Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing.

There were 650 correct entries for last week's BOLDFACEd FEEDBACK puzzle, which means Ross won bragging rights for the week. I'll never hear the end of it.

You can win either a puzzle book or the warm glow of satisfaction knowing you're a generous person who caused a contribution to the Fairfield County Community Foundation. Guess the range for this week's puzzle, and good luck!

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print). 

Thursday, January 17, 2013

NPR Puzzle - 1/13/13 - You Wanted Feedback?

We think the answer to last Sunday's NPR puzzle:
Think of two familiar, unhyphenated, eight-letter words that contain the letters A, B, C, D, E and F, plus two others, in any order. What words are these?
is boldface and feedback.

I have to say that mention of unhyphenated led me to hope that the answers weren't compound words ... which would have been something more special. But the intended answers (we think) are listed as single words in the latest editions of most dictionaries, and importantly Merriam-Webster.

If your dictionary gives either of these answers as two-word, or hyphenated, the chances are you have an old edition ... or the lexicographers are unwise to contemporary usage and/or not very hip and trendy.

Some commenters had a problem with one of the "two others" in feedback needing to be taken from A thru F again. I have to say that doesn't bother me, and I wouldn't even have noticed if it hadn't been pointed out. I guess "two others" could be read to be two other letters in general, or two letters other than the aforementioned.

When I looked up feedback in Flickr last Sunday, I found lots of wonderful examples of photographic feedback, but couldn't show most of them until now ... it might have given the game away. Here then is my pick of the feedback examples on Flickr:


Oh, and if you think this NPR puzzle is rather similar to another recent one, then you'd be right ... and might enjoy the following:
And with that, I'll bid you all adieu till the next time. Magdalen takes over again on Sunday.

Time for

Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500 -- EKW
 
501 - 550 -- skydiveboy
551 - 600
601 - 650 -- Ross
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850 -- Magdalen
851 - 900
901 - 950 -- KDW
951 - 1,000 -- Joe Kupe
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150 -- Dave
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350 -- zeke creek
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550 -- Paul
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950 -- Margaret
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400 -- Curtis
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750 -- Laura
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

Sunday, January 13, 2013

NPR Puzzle - 1/13/13 -- 0xDECAFBAD

This will be your last week of Crossword Man for a while. Magdalen finishes her Stonecoast MFA residency today and we'll be back home anon. Yes, this time I joined Magdalen for the final couple of days and experienced some of the public events in the program, as well as downtown Freeport, ME.

Possibly the biggest cultural experience for me was to enter the amazing L.L.Bean stores. They certainly know how to deal with weather, and I took the opp to stock up on a new winter coat, hat and gloves. I'm expecting a lot more of the white stuff this season.

And I should warn anyone heading this way that you can't go two steps without bumping into (1) moose, (2) lobsters. Whoever called Maine the "Pine Tree State" obviously didn't get the memo.

Anyway, all that's by-the-by and I should get on to this week's NPR puzzle:
Think of two familiar, unhyphenated, eight-letter words that contain the letters A, B, C, D, E and F, plus two others, in any order. What words are these?
Hmm. Getting A through E is easy enough, but adding that F is tricky. Anyone who plays Scrabble-type games might be at an advantage here. I won't say any more till Thursday. Here then are some pictures associated with the answers, which will in no way help you (attributions later in the week):


Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing.

I think I heard "around 80 correct entries" for last week's Sam Loyd puzzle, so KDW is in line for one of our lovely prizes, or can choose to trigger the donation as per the next para. KDW please let us know.

You can win either a puzzle book or the warm glow of satisfaction knowing you're a generous person who caused a contribution to the Fairfield County Community Foundation. Guess the range for this week's puzzle, and good luck!

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print).