Thursday, February 28, 2013

NPR Puzzle 2/24/13 -- Who Let The Dogs Out?

Here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Name two parts of the human body, 10 letters in all. Place their names one after the other. Take a block of three consecutive letters out of the second word and insert them somewhere inside the first word without otherwise changing the order of any of the letters. The result will name a kind of doctor. What kind of doctor is it?
This is a close one. The parts of the human body are VEIN and ARTERY. VE(TER)INARY.

Here's what Merriam-Webster has to say about the adjective "veterinary":
of, relating to, practicing, or being the science and art of prevention, cure, or alleviation of disease and injury in animals and especially domestic animals
I dunno--does an adjective satisfy the precise wording of the puzzle? I'm not sure it does. I suppose it can be added to the phrase "kind of doctor" so the answer implied is "a veterinary kind of doctor." But I can't say I like the answer being adjectival.

Oh, well, moving on.

To the extent that we at Crossword Man Blog have a policy about tolerance and free speech in the comments, it's roughly this: We tolerate differences in opinion, but we reserve the right to yank a comment that offends us personally or that we believe will offend others. No one has violated this common sense standard recently (or ever, that I can think of). We just thought we'd mention it.

Photos: Of course what I wanted was a photo of the circulatory system that had been made into a kaleidoscope. In that quest I was disappointed. My second hope, namely for an overhead shot of some spaghetti junction, was also dashed.

Still, I'm a sucker for a bare tree...







Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150 -- Paul
151 - 200 -- Curtis
201 - 250 -- skydiveboy
251 - 300 -- Dave
301 - 350 -- EKW
351 - 400 -- KDW
401 - 450 -- Zeke Creek
451 - 500 -- Laura
 
501 - 550 -- Word Woman
551 - 600 -- Ross
601 - 650 -- Magdalen
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800 
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

Sunday, February 24, 2013

NPR Puzzle 2/24/13 - Doctor, Doctor...

Here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Name two parts of the human body, 10 letters in all. Place their names one after the other. Take a block of three consecutive letters out of the second word and insert them somewhere inside the first word without otherwise changing the order of any of the letters. The result will name a kind of doctor. What kind of doctor is it?
This is not immediately obvious. Okay, we haven't solved it yet. Which is going to be a problem when I get to the photos section, but I'm not there yet.

You, of course, are there already. In fact, you're dancing around happily, chortling that you've solved the puzzle. Don't forget to send in the answer here!

Still haven't solved it. [Edited to add: Ross solved it.]

You know what? I don't care. I'm going to go find some pretty photos and include them for NO GOOD REASON other than that I like them. Kaleidoscopic images:







Time for
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing or a contribution to the charity of our choosing in the winner's honor.

There were 350 correct entries for last week's POLICE ACADEMY puzzle, so skydiveboy gets his choice of our current choice of prizes--a puzzle book or a contribution to the Fairfield County Community Foundation. (Email us, SDB, and tell us which you'd prefer.)

Everyone else can decide if today's puzzle (which took us 90 minutes to solve) is hard or easy or maybe the number of entries has more to do with low pressure systems. Factor all that in and let us know your pick for the chance to win either a puzzle book or the warm glow of satisfaction knowing you're a generous person.

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print). 

Thursday, February 21, 2013

NPR Puzzle 2/17/13 - Sequel Academy

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:

Name a well-known movie in two words with a total of 13 letters. Each of the two words contains the letter C. Drop both C's. The letters that remain in the second word of the title will be in alphabetical order, and the letters that remain in the first word will be in reverse alphabetical order. What movie is it?
I loved the spirited defense (well, some of you said you liked it) of this movie: POLICE ACADEMY, which spawned five sequels.

One comment regarding alphabetization. Any anagrams reference guide (Ross has one for the Kindle, here) will lined up all duplicate letters quite happily. So the movie minus the Cs is POLIE AADEMY.

Police Academy was filmed in Toronto. Here are a short stack of beautiful Toronto photos:





Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150 -- Paul
151 - 200
201 - 250 -- Ross
251 - 300 -- Joe Kupe
301 - 350 -- skydiveboy
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450 -- Zeke Creek
451 - 500 -- Laura
 
501 - 550 -- Mendo Jim
551 - 600 -- Marie
601 - 650 -- Magdalen
651 - 700 -- KDW
701 - 750
751 - 800 
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

Sunday, February 17, 2013

NPR Puzzle 2/17/13 - Alphabet Soup: The Movie

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name a well-known movie in two words with a total of 13 letters. Each of the two words contains the letter C. Drop both C's. The letters that remain in the second word of the title will be in alphabetical order, and the letters that remain in the first word will be in reverse alphabetical order. What movie is it?
Ross solved this one, while I tried to figure out whether our Facebook Ads had been cost effective. (They had, but only because we had a $50 coupon.) After solving it, he read the synopsis for the movie to me. I'll admit, I have not seen this one. Is that a hint? Do you really think you know my tastes well enough for it to be a hint?

If you do, send the name of the movie to NPR using their blockbuster Contact Form here.

We're on vacation, so here's a short photo array related to the Wiki page for the movie:




Time for
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing.

There were over 600 correct entries for last week's MANDELA/MONDALE puzzle. Once again, no one picked the proper range. Is it because they've switched over to giving us the number of correct entries? Our current choice of prizes--a puzzle book or a contribution to the Fairfield County Community Foundation--is still up for grabs. Make a guess for the chance to win either a puzzle book or the warm glow of satisfaction knowing you're a generous person. We want you to win!

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print). 

Thursday, February 14, 2013

NPR Puzzle 2/10/13 -- Nelson & Walter 4Ever

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Take the last name of a former president of a foreign country, someone well-known. Change the last letter of this name to an O and rearrange the result. You'll get the last name of someone who wanted to be president of the United States. Who are these two people?
The answer is Nelson MANDELA and Walter MONDALE.

It turns out that frequent commenter DAVE had sent in a variation on this--the answers were the same, but the puzzle hinged on the vowels being in the same places in the two names.

Short post today because we're traveling. More on Sunday!

Three photos of Minneapolis and three of Johannesburg. Guess which is which! (You get one as a freebie.)







Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500 -- Laura
 
501 - 550 -- skydiveboy
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800 -- Ross
801 - 850 -- Mendo Jim
851 - 900 -- KDW
901 - 950 -- Zeke Creek
951 - 1,000 -- EKW
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Dave
1,101 - 1,150 -- Marie
1,151 - 1,200 -- Magdalen
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 -- Curtis
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700 -- Paul
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750 -- Joe Kupe
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

Sunday, February 10, 2013

NPR Puzzle 2/10/13 - Presidential Bee & Wannabee

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Take the last name of a former president of a foreign country, someone well-known. Change the last letter of this name to an O and rearrange the result. You'll get the last name of someone who wanted to be president of the United States. Who are these two people?
Ross solved this one, and I'll be honest: I wasn't watching while he did it, so who knows what sorts of lists or sites he consulted. I just know I have two whole Wiki pages to consult for photos! (It's the simple things that make me happy.)

I hope you're happy with your answer, which you've sent in to NPR through their contact page, found here.

Speaking of answers, more power to Mendo Jim for getting the highly obscure REX STOUT and TO: BUSTER alterno-answer. I don't think Will Shortz would have mentioned it without the proof that someone called Archie "Buster" throughout a specific book.

Time for photos and a disclaimer. I don't normally post photos with people in them, but the man at the podium below is a public figure. That's U.S. Navy Admiral Mike Mullen, then the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. He is not related to either man in today's puzzle--it's the podium (and its location) that is relevant.








Time for
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing.

There were about 850 entries for last week's BEATRIX POTTER / REX STOUT puzzle. Amazingly, that was the one range no one picked. Our current choice of prizes--a puzzle book or a contribution to the Fairfield County Community Foundation--is still up for grabs. Make a guess for the chance to win either a puzzle book or the warm glow of satisfaction knowing you're a generous person. We want you to win!

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print). 

Thursday, February 7, 2013

NPR Puzzle 2/3/13 - "No More Twist!"

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name a famous author, first and last names. Change an X in this name to a B, and rearrange all the letters. The result is how this author might address a memo to the author's most famous character. Who is it?
The answers are: BEATRIX POTTER and TO: PETER RABBIT.

This wasn't precisely hard, but it's one of those puzzles I particularly enjoy. How clever of someone to see the connection between a near-anagram of Beatrix Potter and her famous rabbit.

That's not my favorite Potter story. That honor goes to The Tailor of Gloucester, simply because I love love love the embroidered waistcoat:

An embroidered waistcoat at the Victoria & Albert Museum
I had to scrounge on Sunday for photos of exotic places mentioned in Beatrix Potter's Wiki page, which is why there are some museums in the mix. The fact is, she didn't so a whole lot of travel away from her beloved Lake District. And photos of Lake Windermere would rather give the game away. Not today, though. Today, we get to revel in the glories of the Lake District. (Click through for more information on each photo.)







Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500 -- Laura
 
501 - 550 -- Michelle
551 - 600 -- Marie
601 - 650 -- Joe Kupe
651 - 700 -- Ross
701 - 750 -- KDW
751 - 800 -- Curtis
801 - 850
851 - 900 -- Paul
901 - 950 -- EKW
951 - 1,000 -- Anonymous
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150 -- Richard
1,151 - 1,200 -- Magdalen
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850 -- skydiveboy
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000 -- Marie
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).