Thursday, August 29, 2013

NPR Puzzle 8/25/13 - Working at the Car Wash, Yeah

Here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Think of a business that's found in most towns. Its name consists of two words, each starting with a consonant. Interchange the consonants and you'll get two new words — neither of which rhymes with the original words. What business is it?
The answer is CAR WASH. War Cash doesn't rhyme...or make much sense.

This reminds me of the day my head exploded. Henry and I used to get the actual Saturday edition of the Times of London to do The Listener (hardest crossword in the English language, yadda yadda). Saturday's puzzle page in The Times is massive--pages, actually. On day Philip Howard, a Times editor who dabbled in word puzzles, posed this one: What three letter word rhymes with the three-letter word created when you reverse the letters? (In other words, ABC rhymes with CBA.)

The answer--according to an authority no less than The Times of London--is WAR, which rhymes with RAW. Has your head exploded yet? Find a Brit and ask him or her to say the two words. They rhyme in an English accent. (I have no idea if CAR and WAR rhyme in an English accent. I suspect not.)

For Sunday's photos, I rejected "car" as a search word in Flickr. "Wash" yielded photos 1, 2, and 3 (water dripping from a washing line); 4 is an actual car wash; 5 & 6 are of Westlake Village, and Westlake Theatre, respectively. The movie Car Wash was filmed in the Westlake area of Los Angeles.



Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400 -- skydiveboy
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550 -- zeke creek
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850 -- Ross
851 - 900
901 - 950 -- Magdalen
951 - 1,000 -- EKW
1,001 - 1,050 -- Word Woman
1,051 - 1,100 -- Marie
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250 -- David
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 -- Curtis
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550 -- Joe Kupe
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

Sunday, August 25, 2013

WHOO-HOO! You Go, Joe Kupe!! (Also: NPR Puzzle 8/25/13)

Hey, Joe -- Congratulations!! Very cool listening to you struggle prevail ICE the on-air puzzle! Way to go, Kupe! (Would it have killed you to mention your second favorite (third favorite?) puzzle blog?)

Anyway, we salute you, and I'm sure I speak for many of us--LOVE the accent!

On to this week's NPR puzzle:
Think of a business that's found in most towns. Its name consists of two words, each starting with a consonant. Interchange the consonants and you'll get two new words — neither of which rhymes with the original words. What business is it?
Here's where I explain my approach to these "Think of a ... " puzzles. I think of an example of whatever it is I'm supposed to be thinking of, and then I manipulate it in the fashion Dr. Shortz suggests. Turned out, my initial effort was right this week. So, from my perspective, it's easy.

And you undoubtedly think it's easy, so go ahead and send it in to NPR at their SOOPER SEKRIT contact form here.

Photos are going to be tough this week. Let me think. Okay, a bit of a mixed bag:







Time for
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing or a contribution to The One Fund Boston (or the American Red Cross, currently helping communities hit by tornadoes) in the winner's honor.

As previously mentioned, Joe Kupe was the ON-AIR guest AND picked the right range! Whoo-hoo! So, Joe, you get a puzzle book--I guarantee it's not one that NPR will be sending you!--or a contribution. Let us know. And again, great job!

Okay, everyone, easy puzzle this week, so back to Ross's "lazy intern" theory? Or what? Pick a range and submit those answers so that we can have a third person from our little club be the ON-AIR guest!

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print). 

Thursday, August 22, 2013

NPR Puzzle 8/18/13 -- Last? Really? That's the Answer?

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
The Roman numeral for 38 is XXXVIII. What is special or unusual about this Roman numeral that sets it apart from every other Roman numeral that can be written?
This is very easy to solve...if you cheat. If you don't cheat (and I know NONE of you ever do that), then the solution depends on thinking about XXXVIII as letters as well as numbers. If you put all the Roman numerals in alphabetical order, XXXVIII is always going to be last on the list. Always.

[...commence groaning in V...IV...III...II...I...]

For the photo array in Sunday's post, I looked up "last" and "final" in Flickr. In order, the photos represent "final approach," "last stars," "last day of summer," "last light," "last light," and "final resting place."

Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200 -- Joe Kupe
201 - 250 -- Al
251 - 300 -- Marie
301 - 350 -- Curtis
351 - 400 -- skydiveboy
401 - 450 -- zeke creek
451 - 500 -- janetfap
 
501 - 550 -- Paul
551 - 600 -- Magdalen
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750 -- Word Woman
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000 -- Ross
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry BW
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 



Sunday, August 18, 2013

NPR Puzzle 8/18/13 -- It's Unique I Tell You! Really Unique!

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
The Roman numeral for 38 is XXXVIII. What is special or unusual about this Roman numeral that sets it apart from every other Roman numeral that can be written?
Henry's here this weekend. Ross and I know the answer through [REDACTED] but Henry's solving it the old fashioned way: he's EARNING it. (Sorry, I had to channel the Smith-Barney ads with John Houseman.)

You already know the answer, right? Well, don't forget to send it in to NPR using their Contact Us form here. And given how fugly their website redesign is, you may actually want to use our link for once!

Photos. I'm saying nothing about these, lest I inadvertently hint something. Just gaze on them and be inspired.







Time for
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing or a contribution to The One Fund Boston (or the American Red Cross, currently helping communities hit by tornadoes) in the winner's honor.

David won with his "usual" spot. Ross thinks the current intern is going for really round numbers, so "over 1,000" or "under 2,000" will come up more often than, say, "around 230" or "just over 750" or even "694." Do you agree with Ross? (I don't.) If you do, better snatch up the "00" overs and unders right quick!

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print). 

Thursday, August 15, 2013

Shh...bloggers are napping...

Hi. I'll post the usual Thursday post tomorrow (Friday) uh, how about never? simply because if I do it now, it will be gibberish. And you deserve so much more!

Edited to add: Well, okay, so I had some deadlines, and some guests, and some chores, and you know how it is. Don't you? Please say you do.

But I'm not sick, and I don't want anyone to think my erratic behavior is because of that.

Okay, so the answer to Sunday's puzzle is that the gender is male, and he's referring EITHER to himself or his son. Probably the son, but I can argue it either way, so I'll be interested to see what Will says the answer is.

Here are this week's picks:

Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400 -- zeke creek
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550 -- Word Woman
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry BW
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200 -- Magdalen
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450 -- Ross
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550 -- Joe Kupe
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400 -- Curtis
2,401 - 2,450 -- Marie
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750 -- Laura
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

Sunday, August 11, 2013

NPR Puzzle 8/11/13 -- Back to the Classics?

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
It's a twist on an old puzzle: "Nieces and nephews have I none, but that man's father is my father's son." What is the gender of the speaker? And who is the speaker referring to?
Uh. ::chirp chirp::

You know the answer; send it in here. (Edited to add, we had a bit of disagreement about the correct answer to the second question.)

I'm seriously tempted to allow hints on this one, simply because I refuse to believe that any of my readers a) has never heard it before, or b) can't figure it out in five seconds even if they haven't heard it before. BUT, I'm not going to allow hints, because they're too easy. Instead, just tell me in your comments whether you already knew it, or how many seconds it took to solve it if you didn't already know it. (You can take your bitingly clever hints over to Blaine's blog.)

Photos. Hmm. Well, the answer's in these someplace, but as none of you needs the answer, who cares. Also, while I normally don't include real people in the photo section, I don't think anyone can complain here. (I'm pretty sure most of the Wentz's in the 1925 reunion aren't around, and the ones that are still alive look really different now.) Click any photo to get more information.


Don't miss the photo on the mantel of the original family reunion in 1999. (Also, don't you love the red hair gene?)

And I thought MY family was odd...

Here we have the blond-hair gene.


And the "no hair" gene...

 Time for
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing or a contribution to The One Fund Boston (or the American Red Cross, currently helping communities hit by tornadoes) in the winner's honor.

Again, over 2,000 entries. Word Woman won because her comment posted before Mendo Jim's for the same range. So, WW, do let us know if you'd like a puzzle book or a contribution to One Fund Boston or the Red Cross. And everyone should be sure to pick a range for next week!

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print). 


Saturday, August 10, 2013

NPR Puzzle 8/4/13 -- Abducted by Aliens Eating Sushi (that's my story...)

Oh, wow. So sorry I didn't post on Thursday. I have an excuse for not posting on Thursday at the normal time, but NO excuse for the 44 hours after that. And it's not like I can claim the dog ate the post! (I did get abducted by aliens, in that I started reading Linnea Sinclair's sci-fi romances, and really did get caught up in them!)

Still...

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Name a foreign make of automobile. Cross out several letters in its name. The remaining letters, reading in order from left to right, will spell a food that comes from the country where the car is made. What is the country, and what is the food?
The answers were MITSUBISHI, JAPAN and SUSHI. We so happy that Dr. Shortz had a pleasantly mindless vacation in the Land of the Rising Sun.

I'll explain the photos below (in Sunday's post), but not post new ones. Everyone knows the "Three Diamonds" logo for Mitsubishi cars, right? That's one explanation for the manufacturer's name. But according to Wiki, it's actually "Three Water Caltrops" or water chestnuts. The photo that has a clementine as an orange Halloween moon? Those "bats" are actually caltrops. Photo #2 shows caltrop leaves. The other photos are all taken on the campus of Seikei Universtiy, which has a close association with Mitsubishi.

Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750 -- Paul
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- Joe Kupe
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry BW
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900 -- zeke creek
1,901 - 1,950 -- Ross
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050 -- Word Woman
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300 -- Magdalen
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400 -- Curtis
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750 -- Marie
2,751 - 3,000 -- David
3,001 - 3,250 -- skydiveboy
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

Sunday, August 4, 2013

NPR Puzzle 8/4/13 -- Food in a Car

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Name a foreign make of automobile. Cross out several letters in its name. The remaining letters, reading in order from left to right, will spell a food that comes from the country where the car is made. What is the country, and what is the food?
Yeah, okay. (Sorry, Will--I'm not blown away by this one.)

Whether you raced off with this puzzle, or it drove you crazy, be sure to send in your answer to NPR using their lovely Contact Us form.

It's cold here in NE Pennsylvania. No, really. The temperature was in the 50s when we woke up this morning! Brrr.

Photos. Well, this one is tricky. I can't show you the car (duh) or the food (duh) or the country (well...no, I looked), so I'm going to Wiki.






(That's not the food, by the way.)

 Time for
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing or a contribution to The One Fund Boston (or the American Red Cross, currently helping communities hit by tornadoes) in the winner's honor.

Wow, over 2,500 entries. Ross's theory is that NPR has a new intern who counts the entries in Base 8. You may have a different explanation. Whatever your theory, be sure to pick a range for next week!

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print). 


Thursday, August 1, 2013

NPR Puzzle 7/28/13 -- Will Shortz & The AceTones

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
In three words, name a product sold mainly to women that has the initials N-P-R. The answer is a common phrase.
Easy enough, I thought. The answer is NAIL POLISH REMOVER. Trust me, finding non-spoiler photos was a lot harder than solving the puzzle.

So let me share some of the spoiler-y photos I couldn't show you on Sunday! The nails are obvious, the car is from a Polish wedding, the garage is an "after" photo for a polished concrete company in Virginia, and the Indian god Ganesh is the "Remover of Obstacles."







Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750 -- Paul
751 - 800
801 - 850 -- Joe Kupe
851 - 900
901 - 950 -- skydiveboy
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry BW
1,101 - 1,150 -- Ross
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 -- Curtis
1,401 - 1,450 -- Magdalen
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050 -- Mendo Jim
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).