Sunday, September 29, 2013

Better Figure This One Out--You May Need It!

Here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Name something in seven letters that most people keep in their homes. Take the first, third, fourth and seventh letters and rearrange them. The result will be a four-letter word naming something that the seven-letter thing is commonly used for. What is it?
We're working on this. I'll let you know when we get it.

tick...tock...tick...tock... (Imagine the Final Jeopardy music if you like.)

Okay. Ross has the answer. I now have the challenge of coming up with photos!

While I'm thinking about that, be sure to send in your answer using the lovely contact form supplied, in secret, by NPR.

Photos! About which...well, let's let them speak for themselves, shall we?







 Time for
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing or a contribution to The One Fund Boston (or the American Red Cross, currently helping communities hit by tornadoes) in the winner's honor.

Last week's ???? of a puzzle garnered only "150" winning answers. No one won. This one seems marginally easier...? At least, I'm not hinting by using question marks all over the place!

You have all solved this week's puzzle. Now figure out how many other people will! Pick a range and see if you can win.

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print). 

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Questioning Dr. Shortz's Character?

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
The name of what character, familiar to everyone, contains each of the five vowels (A, E, I, O and U) exactly once? The answer consists of two words — eight letters in the first word, four letters in the second.
Get read to roll your eyes, if you didn't solve this by now. The answer is QUESTION MARK. Yes, it all came down to the meaning of the word "character."

When everyone's done groaning, here's something to cheer you up:



Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200 -- Joe Kupe
201 - 250
251 - 300 -- Ross
301 - 350 -- Marie
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450
451 - 500 -- KDW
 
501 - 550 -- Word Woman
551 - 600
601 - 650 -- Barbara H.
651 - 700 -- zeke creek
701 - 750 -- Alex B.
751 - 800 -- Magdalen
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

Sunday, September 22, 2013

Don't You Just Love the "Tricky" Ones?

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
The name of what character, familiar to everyone, contains each of the five vowels (A, E, I, O and U) exactly once? The answer consists of two words — eight letters in the first word, four letters in the second.
Got it. And got some of the decoys, useful for the photo section below.

You got it too, so you've already sent your answer in to the Contact Us form that NPR so generously hides supplies for you.

THIS IS A NO-HINTS BLOG POST. Yes, I realize that limits our chances of getting mentioned on-air when someone stumbles upon us and gets the right answer because of our hints. I can live with obscurity more easily than I can live with the guilt.

So you know what that means--I don't want to catch any of the hints in your comments. Make them so tangential, so obscure, I don't see them.

Many thanks. :-)

Photos. As I say, we generated a list of  * * * * * * * *  * * * * having only AEIOU once. Here, now, are some photos inspired by that list.

Antiques Shop

Baroness Quin

Fountain Pens

Gasoline Pump

Laughing Dove (its name, not its activity)

Lucretia Mott (on the right)

Time for
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing or a contribution to The One Fund Boston (or the American Red Cross, currently helping communities hit by tornadoes) in the winner's honor.

The winning answer was "around 850" which means zeke creek wins. Again! Want that puzzle book now? LOL

You have all solved this week's puzzle. Now figure out how many other people will! Pick a range and see if you can win.

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print). 

Thursday, September 19, 2013

It Would Take More Than Two Letters To Turn Ford Into Gore

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name a well-known person from the 20th century who held an important position. Take the first and last letters of this person's last name, change each of them to the next letter of the alphabet, and you'll get the last name of another famous person who held the same position sometime after the first one. Who is it?
Vice presidents on parade! Gerald Ford, who has by far the more interesting geographical history (see his Wiki page) was Nixon's veep, and Al "The Shortest Name in Politics" Gore was Clinton's veep. The only real argument is whether vice president is "an important position."

Sunday's photos are all about Gerald Ford. (I'll be honest; I liked his wife, Betty, more than I liked him.) The first three are of Grand Rapids, MI, then one of Oak Park, IL, and the bottom two are Omaha, NE.

By contrast, Al Gore would have been Tennessee and Harvard. Boring. (I like him better than his wife, although I daresay she's a perfectly lovely person despite being called "Tipper.")

You can click on any of the photos in Sunday's post for more information.

Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600 -- Maggie Strasser
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850 -- zeke creek
851 - 900 -- Ross
901 - 950
951 - 1,000 -- Word Woman
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry BW
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250 -- Magdalen
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 -- Curtis
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000 -- Marie
2,001 - 2,050 -- Joe Kupe
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350 -- skydiveboy
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750 -- Mendo Jim
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

Sunday, September 15, 2013

Three in a Row--It's a Famous Name Mutilation Spree!

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name a well-known person from the 20th century who held an important position. Take the first and last letters of this person's last name, change each of them to the next letter of the alphabet, and you'll get the last name of another famous person who held the same position sometime after the first one. Who is it?
Ross solved it, then led me like a tiny child to the solution. Hey, no shame in that. I have a blog to write.

You, too, are qualified to lead dimwits like myself to the answer because you, like Ross, have solved it. Don't forget to send your answer in to NPR using their cleverly hidden contact us page.

All my photos today are of places mentioned in ONE of the famous people's Wiki page. Why not both famous people? Because the other person's geographical choices are BORING. That's my hint to you. Make of it what you will.







Time for
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing or a contribution to The One Fund Boston (or the American Red Cross, currently helping communities hit by tornadoes) in the winner's honor.

The winning answer was "around 450" which means zeke creek wins! Send us an email (address in the paragraph above, which no one reads anymore) saying what prize you'd like. We do still have puzzle books, so there's not shame in asking for that!

Beyoncé and Mar "CK" Antony. You have all solved this week's puzzle. Now figure out how many other people will! Pick a range and see if you can win.

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print). 

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Et Tu, Marc Antony? (Brutus's name doesn't work for this one)

Here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Name a famous person in history with four letters in the first name and six letters in the last. Move the first letter of all this to the end. The result will be a two-word phrase that might be defined as "the opposite of a curve." Who's the famous person, and what's the phrase?
We'd put Henry to work last weekend, taking apart the doors to the "Trash Mahal"--a mini-shed that holds our trash bins. Because the shed is near the front of the house, it has to look nice, so our landscape architects made sure it matched the house. That meant pale gray siding, white trim and black doors. Only the guy ("Bugsy") who painted the doors didn't exactly supply them with the coverage they needed for exposure to the elements, so they needed repainting.

Yes, we can do this stuff ourselves. We just don't want to. Enter Henry, who's a really good sport about this stuff, perhaps because at the end of the weekend, he leaves it all behind.

Anyway, he went off on Sunday morning to start reassembling the doors, and when he came in for a spot of tea (as crossword puzzles would have you believe Brits call it), he had solved the puzzle.

MARC ANTONY = ARC ANTONY[M]

When you're all done rolling your eyes, groaning, or grinning, I'll say that I think this one was pretty hard. Still don't know how Henry got it.

Our neighbors' plane was found on Sunday. It had crashed a couple miles south of the airstrip. Presumably something went horribly wrong during their approach. They've been identified. RIP, Tom and Elaine. All very, very sad.

Sunday's photos were all of two place names I found in the Wiki article on Marc Antony: Alexandria and Media. The last two are of Alexandria--the grey wall with all the cubbies is actually the Alexandria Library in Egypt; the leafy brick & ivy photo is of Alexandria, VA. The other four are Medias (funny: media is already a plural): two modern buildings in Germany, a new footbridge in Media City, and an antique car show in Media, Pennsylvania. (Home of my dentist, you'll be happy to know.)

Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100 -- Joe Kupe
101 - 150 -- Laura
151 - 200 -- skydiveboy
201 - 250 -- Word Woman
251 - 300 -- EKW
301 - 350 -- KDW
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450 -- zeke creek
451 - 500 -- Magdalen
 
501 - 550 -- David
551 - 600 -- Ross
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800 -- Alex B.
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000 -- Marie
1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750 -- Mendo Jim
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

Sunday, September 8, 2013

Another Famous Person's Name Gets Tortured!

Here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Name a famous person in history with four letters in the first name and six letters in the last. Move the first letter of all this to the end. The result will be a two-word phrase that might be defined as "the opposite of a curve." Who's the famous person, and what's the phrase?
Henry got it, which is impressive because...well, it just is.

But I'm sure you have solved it, and sent in the answer using the handy-dandy Contact Us form. (Hey, Dr. Shortz--would let the nice people at NPR know that they left off the link to the Contact Us form on the page with the actual puzzle? Thanks.)

It's been a crazy weekend, and a sad one. Our property is separated by a dead-end dirt road from properties that slope up to a flat, grassy airstrip, co-owned by some pilots. One of them retired here with his wife, a former police detective. Tom and Elaine built a lovely house with a great view and an attached hangar. They owned several planes, including a large two-engine Bobcat, bright yellow.

Over a week ago, Tom and Elaine took off to fly the Bobcat to Iowa where there was an antique plane show. They left Iowa last Monday, flew to Illinois, then to Ohio, and finally stopped for gas about a 45 minute flight from here. They took off from that airport at 7:30 p.m. Monday evening. They never made it home, although the civil air patrol believes they got close because Tom's cell phone is still on and pinging from nearby towers.

They're retired, and both pilots. As I learned yesterday, they have no children. Several days passed before anyone noticed they weren't home. We learned about all of this when a dozen vehicles tried to get up to the airstrip from our road (they'd overshot the only access point; turning around was a bit of a production). An hour later our nearest neighbor called to explain about Tom's plane being missing.

I made brownies for the personnel running the search, which felt stupid, but they got eaten, so it couldn't have been such a terrible idea. Other than that, all we can do is wait for news. I don't think anyone believes the news will be good but knowing is better than not knowing.

I trust your weekend is going better!

Photos. Well, our famous person in history has a Wiki page, so I took two locations from that article and looked them up and found all kinds of cool places with the same names!







Time for
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing or a contribution to The One Fund Boston (or the American Red Cross, currently helping communities hit by tornadoes) in the winner's honor.

Last week's puzzle garnered over 2,700 answers. No winner. How do you think the people who knew Beyoncé's name will do with this week's famous person? Pick a range and see if you can win!

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print). 

Thursday, September 5, 2013

To Beyoncé and Beyond! (Also: Mr. T in MS)

Here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Think of a well-known celebrity who goes by a single name — the last two letters of which are alphabetically separated by only one letter (like A and C, or B and D). Replace this pair of letters with the one that separates them, and you'll have a common, everyday word. What is it?
Ross got this immediately by thinking of a one-named star and getting Beyoncé. Henry got it because I gather she was performing in a concert in the Philadelphia area so, as he put it, "I only had to listen to the traffic report."

I didn't get it because I'd looked up a list of single-name stars and lo! no Beyoncé on the list. Instead, they had Mr. T, where the puzzle almost works if you accept "ms" as a word--either Ms. or short for manuscript. Of course no one rational would accept that, but it's a fun thought.

Did anyone get the significance of the photos? No? Well, Beyoncé and Jay-Z (whose real name is Jay Carter) have had a baby girl, named Blue Ivy Carter. Read from top to bottom, the photos are: Blue, Ivy, Carter, Blue, Ivy, Carter.

Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600 -- Mendo Jim
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750 -- zeke creek
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950 -- David
951 - 1,000 -- Magdalen
1,001 - 1,050 -- Word Woman
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry
1,101 - 1,150 -- Marie
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250 -- skydiveboy
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000 -- Ross
2,001 - 2,050 -- Joe Kupe
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print). 

Sunday, September 1, 2013

NPR Puzzle 9/1/13 -- Mozas?

Here's this week's NPR puzzle:
Think of a well-known celebrity who goes by a single name — the last two letters of which are alphabetically separated by only one letter (like A and C, or B and D). Replace this pair of letters with the one that separates them, and you'll have a common, everyday word. What is it?
Ross used my method from last week (think of the first person who fits the pattern, manipulate according to the directions...) and got it right away.

I did not.

But you guys did.  And that mean you need the all-singing, all-dancing NPR Contact Us form link to send your answer in.

End of summer, at least here. We estimate a couple more nice days of swimming, then it's going to be tragically cooler. In another month we could start to see some lake effect snow.

Photos. Not saying much. See if you can figure it out, given that you've solved the puzzle already.







Time for
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing or a contribution to The One Fund Boston (or the American Red Cross, currently helping communities hit by tornadoes) in the winner's honor.

At first, I thought the correct range was just under 900, in which case no one won. Then Ross pointed out that it was >900. I checked and whoo-hoo! I won!!

So, how does the holiday weekend play into your strategy for selecting a range? Higher? Lower? Pick a range for a chance to win. Be sure to show all work!

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I just like having fine print).