Thursday, February 13, 2014

Gulliver Travels to NPR

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name a title character from a classic work of fiction, in 8 letters. Change the third letter to an M. The result will be two consecutive words naming parts of the human body. Who is the character, and what parts of the body are these?
Delightfully simple. The body parts are GUM + LIVER, so the titular character is GULLIVER.

In honor of Gulliver's Travels to Lilliputia, here are some miniature villages/landscapes selected to look a whole lot like the USUAL photos I run of the U.K. and Europe, only teeny-tiny.















Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450 -- Maggie Strasser
451 - 500 -- Magdalen
 
501 - 550 -- Joe Kupe
551 - 600 -- Ross
601 - 650
651 - 700 -- Word Woman
701 - 750
751 - 800 
801 - 850 -- zeke creek
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

Something there is that doesn't love a blank comment form.
I think "gum" is more often a verb or an adjective than a noun.
An oldster might gum his food or you can have gum disease, but while you have a liver or a heart, you wouldn't be likely to talk about your gum, but your "gums."

Anonymous, because Blogger didn't give a name slot.
Mendo Jim