Sunday, February 9, 2014

SPLAT! (Wipes Egg Off Blog Face)

Before the usual intro, let me just say that we got it wrong. I can complain that you aren't "seeing" the word ShE, you're seeing 3:45. Ditto 5:14 does not read h1S unless you're standing on your head. (Ross points out we'd have done better in Australia or New Zealand.) Add to that the way the puzzle was recorded in print (we copy & paste direct from the NPR website), it had the words in all-caps, which is not how you "see" the words on a digital clock.

None of that changes the fact that we got it wrong. *sigh* Moving on...

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name a title character from a classic work of fiction, in 8 letters. Change the third letter to an M. The result will be two consecutive words naming parts of the human body. Who is the character, and what parts of the body are these?
Whew. Done. I won't say there's only one answer, but only one that's obvious. Not that obviousness is an indicator of correctness these days... (Why yes, I am a little bitter. Why do you ask?)

Submit your answer here.

Pretty pictures will soothe me back to a good mood.













Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing or a contribution in the winner's honor to the Red Cross, or World Food Programme, both helping communities hit by Haiyan (aka Super Typhoon Yolanda).

FIFTEEN entries. No one guessed lower than 100 (except for an enterprising chap who guessed so late it was clearly illegal and thus disqualified), so we all lost. Again. Better luck next week?

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600." We retain the discretion to award the prize to an entrant who picked the adjacent range (e.g., 601-650) if that entrant had not already won a prize. In the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of January, 2014, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do.. 

7 comments:

curtisjohnsonimages said...

The digital clock answer to last week's challenge seemed more obtuse than sherry/whiskey (which is the answer I submitted). This week's puzzle gives a less ambiguous answer, so I'll gravitate back to my standard 351 - 400.

zeke creek said...

It was the punctuation in each word of last weeks puzzle...keep moving. May I have 801-850?

Word Woman said...

651:700,* please ;-).

(*aka 651-700)

Interesting to think of using a colon to represent eyes in emoticons (since we are talking body parts).

Anonymous said...

One of the PM's most glaring faults over the years has been his refusal to recognize, thoroughly legitimate, alternates to the answer he had in mind.
This week I can picture him with his long-suffering assistant, stamping his foot and yelling "No, no, no. Only my answer is right. Those other 301 to 350 (the actual Range) people are just wrong, wrong, wrong. Ignore them!"

As for today's challenge, one "body part" is kind of hard to think of in the singular.

We may need to come up with something besides the Range as an adjunct endeavor.
Mendo Jim

Joe Kupe said...

I am much more certain of our answer this week! 501 to 550 please, thanks!

David said...

1001 to 1050 agin, please (WFP).

Maggie Strasser said...

401-450 please.

Still bummed that my answer of a**hole (take away "ss" to get a-hole) wasn't the answer a few weeks ago.