Thursday, March 13, 2014

"Learn Something New" or "Totally Obscure" -- YOU Make the Call!

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Take the name of a classical Greek mathematician and re-arrange the letters in his name to spell two numbers. What are they?
To state the puzzle in another way: Take the names of two numbers, put them together, and find an anagram of the result that names a classical Greek mathematician. Who is the mathematician and what are the numbers?
I thought Ross would get this immediately, what with all the ways we have of cheating -- I mean, solving it creatively. In the end, though, I had to point out that not all numbers are in the cardinal family. Like PI (which is tomorrow, with the BIG day being next year at precisely 3/14/15 at 9:26:53 a.m. and p.m.--had you all seen that?).

I'd also thought of THOUSAND but what I didn't know and hadn't ever heard of was "the father of algebra," DIOPHANTUS. I'm chalking that up to "learn something new every day."

Congrats to Maggie Strasser and Paul for guessing 314(1) in the Pick a Range game. Wouldn't it be funny if that won?

Happy Pi Day. I don't plan on making dessert, but I might make Guyanese Tennis Rolls, just because they look so divine.













Time for

Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100 -- Ross
101 - 150
151 - 200 -- Mendo Jim
201 - 250 -- David
251 - 300 -- Phil
301 - 350 -- Maggie Strasser
351 - 400 -- zeke creek
401 - 450 -- Magdalen
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750 -- Word Woman
751 - 800 
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- Sarah
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650 
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250 -- Paul
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

That's the solution I came up with. My objection was to "thousand," which I prefer to think of as "one thousand." But I'm not saying that WS was wrong, merely that I didn't like that number as a choice.

As for pi, I asked Mendo Jim whether he would understand why I like that number. My original comment, which I deleted as too obvious a hint, was "It may be odd of me, but I like the number with fewer letters." The odd letters in my name were the referent of that.

Phil

Mendo Jim said...

Pi is actually an infinite number of numbers, depending on how exact you want to be.
I would have been happier with "thousand" than with "pi" if those were my answers.
I was going with "one" and "oh" from Theon. I was (and am) somewhat uncomfortable with the shorter word.
I think it would be interesting for Dr. S to tell us how he "made" this puzzle.




















Word Woman said...

Oh, no.

Word Woman said...

Magdalen, let us know if you serve those round tennis ball rolls. In that realm, do you suppose Will would accept LOVE for ZERO, er, OH?