Thursday, May 22, 2014

Pass the Pepto Bismol to Will Shortz, STAT!

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name a famous actress of the past whose last name has two syllables. Reverse the syllables phonetically. The result will name an ailment. What is it?
Okay, the answer--in case you only just woke up from a 5-year nap--is Sarah BERNHARDT turning into HEARTBURN.

Here's my only question: Did Will Shortz know that he was repeating himself? And if he didn't, was he upset when he realized it? Or is it all a big shrug to him? Not that he has to care. I mean, if it was me, I'd be immured in some leaf mold someplace on our property, refusing to emerge because I was that embarrassed. But that's me, and there are many very excellent reasons why he's a multi-millionaire puzzle master and I'm...not. Inability to feel excessive shame being one of them.

Incidentally, the highlighting in the Honorable Mention that included "enormous" as the answer...that was ("sic") copied straight from the NPR website. No shame there!

Paul claimed to see the connection between the photos on Sunday of Beverly Hills and the puzzle. Well, if you did, I'm seriously impressed. Here's what it was: When I hear the word heartburn, I think of Nora Ephron's roman a clef about her divorce from Carl Bernstein. So I Wiki'd Nora Ephron and was surprised to learn that she was raised in Beverly Hills (her parents were screenwriters). She just doesn't seem all that Californian. Anyway, in her memory, I picked photos of her hometown.

Okay, I'm trying to get you guys to pick the Word of the Week that I use to pick photos on Thursdays. If you won't volunteer, I'll just pick. This week, it's "fair and square," which I found in Paul's comment. (Poor Paul, getting picked on twice.) Turns out to be a wonderful offering. (Yay, Paul!)













Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800  
801 - 850
851 - 900 -- legolambda
901 - 950 -- Joe Kupe
951 - 1,000 -- Ross
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250 -- Zeke Creek
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 -- Curtis
1,401 - 1,450 -- Magdalen
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550 -- Word Woman
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650 
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500 -- Mendo Jim

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000 -- Paul
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

2 comments:

Paul said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Paul said...

Word of the week, wow, I'm honored! I'm really enjoying learning about Don Justo and his cathedral.
When I read the 2009 post, I immediately thought of Beverly Sills. I should have realized that there is some acting involved in opera. Anyway, there should be some kind of puzzle in Beverly (H/S)ills. Or maybe there already has been.