Thursday, June 5, 2014

Meloncholy at the Baptismal Font

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Take the name of a well-known American businessman — first and last names. Put the last name first. Insert an M between the two names. The result names a food item. What is it?
Answer: ELON MUSK (who? see here) becomes MUSKMELON (see here).

As we thought, and some of you pointed out, this isn't exactly a household name. Unless you've been following the race to get "ordinary, albeit very rich" guys into space. In which case, sure, you may have heard of him.

Let's see if MELON gives any interesting pictures on Flickr (as none of you picked a word, tsk tsk).














Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300 -- Ross
301 - 350
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450 -- Word Woman
451 - 500 -- Maggie Strasser
 
501 - 550 -- Barbara H.
551 - 600 -- Magdalen
601 - 650 -- Jan
651 - 700 -- Paul
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000 -- David
1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650 
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250 -- Mendo Jim
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

5 comments:

Mendo Jim said...

Poor (or not so) Elon.
He has been taking a beating over at Blaines' and now here.
For me, maybe because I am interested in cars, space and California business, he popped up just after Westinghouse and Zuckerberg and before I got out of bed.
And he is supplying the space station since the US government can't, not just openning orbit to well healed possible travellers.

Word Woman said...

Curtis, cultivars pointed me in the right direction.

I always thought the Baptismal Font was Arial. -)

Since we are onto fruits, how about photos to go with peaches sometime as we are getting closer to Saturn Peach harvest?

David said...

I too knew of Elon Musk, as he appears fairly frequently in business news headline emails I get. My major hang-up in getting the answer was missing that of last name first, not first name first. Once I thought of Mr. Musk, I reread the puzzle.

Since WW suggested peaches, how about collie (since melon suggests melancholy which suggests collie). Now you have enough for next week's puzzle.

Word Woman said...

David, I ran into the same first name, last name quandary, especially when sdb suggested the businessman's first name reminded him of a Presidential candidate.

Maggie Strasser said...

Was I close with Alan Sugar, although he's British. Or is he English?