Thursday, September 11, 2014

Give Us a Twirl, Anthea

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Think of a word starting with T. Drop the T, and phonetically you'll get a new word that's a synonym of the first one. What words are these?
The answer we came up with is TWIRL - T = W(h)IRL

It turns out (no pun intended) that "Give us a twirl, Anthea!" is one of the famous catch-phrases for Sir Bruce Forsyth, a master of ceremonies for various TV shows in the UK, including Generation Game, The Price is Right, and Strictly Come Dancing (which we renamed Dancing With the Stars). I tried to find a YouTube clip of Uncle Brucie saying his deathless line, but wasn't successful. You'll just have to imagine it.

We've had a request for PLAYA as the photo word of the day. Someone wants to go to a beach, clearly! (BTW, I'd picked the Racetrack Playa photo before reviewing the Comments--great minds think alike, clearly.)













Time for

Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200 -- Paul
201 - 250 -- Ross
251 - 300 -- B. Haven
301 - 350 -- legolambda
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450
451 - 500 -- Magdalen
 
501 - 550
551 - 600 -- Joe Kupe
601 - 650
651 - 700 -- Word Woman
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850 -- Mendo Jim
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650 
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

7 comments:

Mendo Jim said...

Where did that "(h)" come from?
When you drop the T, you get wirl, which is NOT phonetically "whirl," a synonym of twirl.
Wirl does sound the same as (but is spelled differently from) Wurl, a company which Google tells me makes foundation garments.

Will Shortz has, over the years of his ever-shrinking fan base, trained it to accept such lousy challenges.
This has often put the Sunday Puzzle in the category of horse shoes and hand grenades, where "close" is good enough.

Paul said...

I don't suppose anyone else thought of TRAPPINGS/WRAPPINGS, you know, EPHEMERA?

No? Well ...

MJ, ever tried plum grenades?

Word Woman said...

Thanks for the playa photos, Magdalen.

MJ, I did not get to your question as it has been a whirling, twirling week here, including the drive to and from the playa in 96 hours. I did not see or record any sliders but read about them observed a playa or two away.

No playa on words here, but Paul may be referring to the Flavor Grenade pluots over at PEOTS:

http://wordwomanpartialellipsisofthesun.blogspot.com/2014/09/karst-and-kunming-limestone-forest-tree.html?m=1

Paul said...

As if MJ wasn't ...

Mendo Jim said...

I think it must be a part of human communication, at least in English, to tell the difference between Whig and wig, whir and were, whit and wit, whish and wish and, of course, whirl and "wirl," if there were such word.
And those are just short i's.

Implying "almost" in the clue couldn't have made this any easier and would have saved it from the unacceptable heap.

I went to Racetrack Playa (though I don't remember that name) in Death Valley in the 1950's. I can't find any other places for that phenomenon nearer than 300 miles from Black Rock.

Paul said...

I don't know MJ, wen I hear people say wen, I pretty much figure they're not talking about a cyst, except wen they're doing a crossword puzzle.

BTW, I messed up. If 'trappings' and 'wrappings' have any claim to synonymity, it's probably on the basis of their superficiality rather than their ephemerality. Sorry.

Joe Kupe said...

We entered Twirl/wirl, and yes we think that is phonetically correct! But our alt answer was Twas/was. Now Twas sometimes has a ' in front of it so lets see if Will takes it as a second response!