Thursday, February 27, 2014

No, Not the Peritonsillar One...The One With a C!

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Write down these six words:
  • Cupid
  • Yoo-hoo
  • Eyeball
  • Entrance
  • Seafood
  • Wiper
The six words have something unusual in common. And when you've figured out what it is, that unusual something will suggest the name of a well-known U.S. city. Name that city.
Two tricks to this puzzle. First, spot that the words all start with the sound of a letter other than the one the word starts with. So Q and C for CUPID. Second, spot the acrostic: QUINCY.

Which got me thinking about QUINSY, one of those delightful archaic terms for a medical condition that, when I read about it, I never wonder what the condition actually is. Dropsy, for example. What's that when it's at home?

Quinsy is an infection near a tonsil. Dropsy, I have just learned, is good old edema by another name. Learn something new everyday. (I haven't linked to Wiki because you can go look them up, and medical stuff makes some people squeamish.)

Did you look at the photos in the Sunday Monday post? I couldn't do a complete 6-letter city with the "special" feature, but I managed five of the six letters. Go back and see if you can figure it out. (Clicking or hovering the cursor over those photos will help.)

Here are some photos of Quincy and my 6-letter city (clearly, if you check the final three photos, you'll see the answer):













Time for

Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200 -- Word Woman
201 - 250
251 - 300 -- Mendo Jim
301 - 350
351 - 400 -- Magdalen
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550 -- Joe Kupe
551 - 600
601 - 650 -- Marie
651 - 700 -- Ross
701 - 750
751 - 800 
801 - 850
851 - 900 -- zeke creek
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry BW
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650 -- Phil
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

Monday, February 24, 2014

Oh, Goody, Another City Puzzle!

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Write down these six words:
  • Cupid
  • Yoo-hoo
  • Eyeball
  • Entrance
  • Seafood
  • Wiper
The six words have something unusual in common. And when you've figured out what it is, that unusual something will suggest the name of a well-known U.S. city. Name that city.
Not hard. I'm more than a day late, so you've all solved it already...and sent your answer in to NPR using their chameleon Contact Us form here.

Here's my photo array. See what you can make of this:













Time for
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing or a contribution in the winner's honor to the Red Cross.

Alex B. won with "around 200" entries. What would you like, Alex B., a contribution or a puzzle book? Let me know at the above email address. And we all get to go again. Oh, and because I was sick yesterday--yes, and traveling--there are two posts with range picks in the comments, so check both places to be safe. (So far, 851-900 and 1001-1050 have been picked.)

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600." We retain the discretion to award the prize to an entrant who picked the adjacent range (e.g., 601-650) if that entrant had not already won a prize. In the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of January, 2014, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do.. 

Sunday, February 23, 2014

Placeholder Post

Hi, everyone. Ross and I are in transit. We've solved the puzzle but as we're not home yet (close, though), I'll hold off on the traditional post. Among other things, we haven't heard the podcast yet. Although Anonymous wrote to assure me that Alex B. won, I'll want to verify that for myself. You understand.

More later! We're basking in the relative warmth of the great Northeast--today's the last day for a long time that it's going to be above freezing.

Thursday, February 20, 2014

Lady Gaga Lays in Egg (in Puzzle Form, at Least)

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name a famous entertainer: two words, four letters in each word. You can rearrange these eight letters to spell the acronym of a well-known national organization, and the word that the first letter of this acronym stands for. Who's the entertainer, and what's the organization?
We solved this on our way to Hilton Head on Monday. We had to get up early, take the dog to the kennel, then make our way to the small local airport near Scranton, Avoca. We're lucky--it's a lovely airport, complete with free WiFi. Ross found a list of "entertainers" and lo! he found LADY GAGA. He said, "GAY," and the rest was easy. I remembered GLAAD (formerly the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation, a legal misnomer that I'm glaad they've abandoned), and the puzzle was solved.

We found it hard, although I gather some of you solved it right away. (Congrats!)

I'm going to skip the photos this time. (Hey, I'm on vacation. Can you blame me?)

Time for

Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50 -- Curtis
 51 - 100 -- Paul
101 - 150 -- Anonymous
151 - 200 -- Alex B,
201 - 250 -- EKW
251 - 300 -- Magdalen
301 - 350 -- Ross
351 - 400 -- Word Woman
401 - 450 -- Marie
451 - 500
 
501 - 550 -- David
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800 
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

Sunday, February 16, 2014

Cedric is Not the Entertainer You Seek

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name a famous entertainer: two words, four letters in each word. You can rearrange these eight letters to spell the acronym of a well-known national organization, and the word that the first letter of this acronym stands for. Who's the entertainer, and what's the organization?
We don't have the answer...yet. I'll edit this post when we do. Edited to add: Ross solved it today (Monday) with a little help from me. He got the entertainer and I got the acronym. Teamwork!

You've totally beaten us to the finish line, which I can tell because you've already sent your answer in using the NPR Contact Us form, seen here in its all-white winter ermine form.

In the meantime, here's where we are (symbolically) followed by where we're going tomorrow on vacation:














Time for
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing or a contribution in the winner's honor to the Red Cross.

We have a winner! Word Woman won with "around 700" entries. Let us know, WW, if you want a puzzle book (really! We still have some!) or a contribution to the Red Cross, which is presumably helping families forced out of their homes by the recent series of snowstorms. (In our area, it's house fires caused when the pipes freeze and the homeowners think it makes sense to use a blowtorch.)

Have fun guessing a range for next week, everyone. There will be a Thursday post--we're still wired while we're having fun.

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600." We retain the discretion to award the prize to an entrant who picked the adjacent range (e.g., 601-650) if that entrant had not already won a prize. In the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of January, 2014, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do.. 

Thursday, February 13, 2014

Gulliver Travels to NPR

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name a title character from a classic work of fiction, in 8 letters. Change the third letter to an M. The result will be two consecutive words naming parts of the human body. Who is the character, and what parts of the body are these?
Delightfully simple. The body parts are GUM + LIVER, so the titular character is GULLIVER.

In honor of Gulliver's Travels to Lilliputia, here are some miniature villages/landscapes selected to look a whole lot like the USUAL photos I run of the U.K. and Europe, only teeny-tiny.















Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450 -- Maggie Strasser
451 - 500 -- Magdalen
 
501 - 550 -- Joe Kupe
551 - 600 -- Ross
601 - 650
651 - 700 -- Word Woman
701 - 750
751 - 800 
801 - 850 -- zeke creek
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

Sunday, February 9, 2014

SPLAT! (Wipes Egg Off Blog Face)

Before the usual intro, let me just say that we got it wrong. I can complain that you aren't "seeing" the word ShE, you're seeing 3:45. Ditto 5:14 does not read h1S unless you're standing on your head. (Ross points out we'd have done better in Australia or New Zealand.) Add to that the way the puzzle was recorded in print (we copy & paste direct from the NPR website), it had the words in all-caps, which is not how you "see" the words on a digital clock.

None of that changes the fact that we got it wrong. *sigh* Moving on...

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name a title character from a classic work of fiction, in 8 letters. Change the third letter to an M. The result will be two consecutive words naming parts of the human body. Who is the character, and what parts of the body are these?
Whew. Done. I won't say there's only one answer, but only one that's obvious. Not that obviousness is an indicator of correctness these days... (Why yes, I am a little bitter. Why do you ask?)

Submit your answer here.

Pretty pictures will soothe me back to a good mood.













Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing or a contribution in the winner's honor to the Red Cross, or World Food Programme, both helping communities hit by Haiyan (aka Super Typhoon Yolanda).

FIFTEEN entries. No one guessed lower than 100 (except for an enterprising chap who guessed so late it was clearly illegal and thus disqualified), so we all lost. Again. Better luck next week?

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600." We retain the discretion to award the prize to an entrant who picked the adjacent range (e.g., 601-650) if that entrant had not already won a prize. In the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of January, 2014, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do.. 

Friday, February 7, 2014

I Give Up--Does This Puzzle Even Make Sense?

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
It's a two-part question: Where in most homes will you see the words SHE and HIS, and what word will you see right after HIS?
From the comments on Sunday's post, I don't think we even have a consensus as to the correct answer. Here's what we came up with (and by "we" I mean "Ross"):

SHERRY & WHISKEY

So the answers would be LIQUOR CABINET/SHELF/CUPBOARD/BAR/etc. & KEY

Unless
  1. You don't drink
  2. You don't cook with sherry and/or whiskey
  3. You do drink or cook with whisky, but you spell it without the E
  4. You think anyone who drinks sherry is a ponce
  5. You nonetheless admit that bisque is a lovely soup and if it contains sherry, well, that must be okay
  6. You do drink and/or cook with spirits and fortified wines but they're stored under the sink with the other chemicals that children shouldn't get their pudgy fingers on and that's the cupboard with the best child-proof lock on it
  7. Other
What did you all get?















Time for
Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150 -- Word Woman
151 - 200 -- Curtis
201 - 250 -- zeke creek
251 - 300 -- EKW
301 - 350 -- Mendo Jim
351 - 400 -- KDW
401 - 450 -- Ross
451 - 500 -- Joe Kupe
 
501 - 550 -- Magdalen
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800 
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

Sunday, February 2, 2014

Come Ona My House...

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
It's a two-part question: Where in most homes will you see the words SHE and HIS, and what word will you see right after HIS?
This is not immediately obvious to us, in case you were wondering.

Oh, wait, you weren't wondering because you've solved it already! And sent the answer in to NPR here ("here" being a misleading suggestion that the contact form is readily visible).

Well, at the risk of giving the game away without realizing it, I'm going to show you some rooms in houses. Enjoy!















Time for
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing or a contribution in the winner's honor to the Red Cross, or World Food Programme, both helping communities hit by Haiyan (aka Super Typhoon Yolanda).

Around 300 entries. WTF? No one guessed lower than 500, so we all lost. Better luck next week, I guess.

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600." We retain the discretion to award the prize to an entrant who picked the adjacent range (e.g., 601-650) if that entrant had not already won a prize. In the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of January, 2014, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do..