Thursday, July 31, 2014

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
There are three popular men's names, each six letters long, that differ by only their first letters. In other words, the last five letters of the names are all the same, in the same order. Of the three different first letters, two are consonants and one is a vowel. What names are these?
 We got Austin, Dustin & Justin. Do tell us what other trios answer this puzzle!

Ross and I drove on Tuesday to Princeton, NJ. The campus didn't line up with my recollection from the only other time I've been there (about 20 years ago; a law school classmate had gone to Princeton as an undergrad, so I got "an insider's tour"), which was disconcerting. Memory is unreliable, as I know but don't always believe.

Anyway, I turned to Ross and said that "Princeton" had to be the Word of the Day so that I could pick some nice pix for this post. Flickr, don't fail me now.













Time for

Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450 -- Phil
451 - 500 -- Mendo Jim
 
501 - 550 -- B. Haven
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950 -- zeke creek
951 - 1,000 -- Marie
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300 -- legolambda
1,301 - 1,350 -- Maggie Strasser
1,351 - 1,400 -- Curtis
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500 -- Ross

1,501 - 1,550 -- Joe Kupe
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650 
1,651 - 1,700 -- Magdalen
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050 -- Word Woman
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

Sunday, July 27, 2014

Blame the Name Game

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
There are three popular men's names, each six letters long, that differ by only their first letters. In other words, the last five letters of the names are all the same, in the same order. Of the three different first letters, two are consonants and one is a vowel. What names are these?
I solved it already. (Usually it's Ross who gets it right away, which is why I'm chuffed to be first for once.)

And you've solved it already. And sent the answers (all three names) in to NPR using their single-named Contact Us form.

Henry, the little so-and-so, has asked for "diatonic phrygian tetrachord" as the word of the day. Okay. Here's the one picture Flickr can give me for that:



So I've split the words up. "Tetrachord" nets me nothing in Creative Commons. Here's "diatonic":








And here's what I get with "phrygian":







Time for


This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor. As of this week, we are providing an alternative to the Red Cross. If the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.
No one picked 1700, which was the number given on air for last week's range. Any guesses as to how many will enter this week's challenge?

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600." We retain the discretion to award the prize to an entrant who picked the adjacent range (e.g., 601-650) if that entrant had not already won a prize. In the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of January, 2014, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do..

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Water Turns Into Sweat

Here is this week's OFFICIAL NPR Puzzle:
Name something in five letters that's nice to have a lot of in the summer. Change the last letter to the following letter of the alphabet. Rearrange the result, and you'll name something else that you probably have a lot of in the summer, but that you probably don't want. What is it? (HINT: the second thing is a form of the first thing.)
I gather this has been deemed a super-easy puzzle. The answer I assume Will Shortz wants is WATER - R + S = SWEAT (not WASTE). But I could be wrong.

Ross has decreed that the word of the week is TORNADO, possibly because there was one in our corner of Pennsylvania two weeks ago. Well, actually, there were four, but one in particular touched down two miles from our house.













Time for


Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550 -- B. Haven
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700 -- legolambda
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000 -- Word Woman
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150 -- Ross
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250 -- zeke creek
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350 -- Curtis
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450 -- Magdalen
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550 -- Joe Kupe
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650 
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950 -- Phil
1,951 - 2,000 -- Marie
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750 -- Maggie Strasser
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

Sunday, July 20, 2014

Houston, We Have a Problem

This is NOT this week's NPR Puzzle:
This is a two-part challenge. First, take the phrase "rap yet crash." Rearrange these 11 letters to name something that might follow a crash. Then cross out four letters in this answer. The remaining seven letters in order will spell an appropriate name. What is it?
It's what would have been the puzzle, if the Russian-backed separatists hadn't, allegedly, downed a Malaysian Airlines 777 plane on Thursday. *sigh*

Edited to add: This was the puzzle online until about 10:15 a.m. EDT, when it got replaced by the official CORRECT puzzle, below. Don't hint to the answer to this one; Will Shortz may use it another week, long after the crash is forgotten.

We have, of course, solved that one. You may have too. (What would happen if you sent it in? Sadly, I suspect it would be marked as wrong even though it was the official puzzle as per the website at 10 a.m. EDT.)

This week's NPR Puzzle is something else. Something that I got distracted and didn't hear (well, I knew it's online, right???) and Ross heard but not well enough to think he knows what it is.

UPDATE! We have a puzzle!

Here is this week's OFFICIAL NPR Puzzle:
Name something in five letters that's nice to have a lot of in the summer. Change the last letter to the following letter of the alphabet. Rearrange the result, and you'll name something else that you probably have a lot of in the summer, but that you probably don't want. What is it? (HINT: the second thing is a form of the first thing.)
Okay. We're all good. Solve this one, not that other one. (We have.)

Here's where to send the answer in, using NPR's intact Contact Us form.

Clearly the word of the week is "mistake." Flickr, do your magic!













Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor. As of this week, we are providing an alternative to the Red Cross. If the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.

This week, zeke creek is the winner, with "over 400" entries. So try out our new system, zeke: puzzle book, Red Cross, or your own NPR station.

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600." We retain the discretion to award the prize to an entrant who picked the adjacent range (e.g., 601-650) if that entrant had not already won a prize. In the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of January, 2014, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do..

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Bad Baking & Breaking Bread

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Think of a popular TV show about cooking. I guarantee it's a show everyone has heard of. Remove the second and third letters of the first word and insert them after the first letter of the second word. You'll get a phrase for a different kind of cooking. What is it?
Here's a perfect example of a puzzle that works because of the wording. "Take a hit TV show, shift the letters, etc. to name a cooking method..." would be boring. But the misdirection "show about cooking" was perfect. Stress that phrase the right way and "cooking meth" comes immediately to mind. (Well, Ross's mind...)

So the answer is: BREAKING BAD comes out as BAKING BREAD.

Here's some bread:













Time for

Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100 -- Curtis
101 - 150 -- Phil
151 - 200
201 - 250 -- Magdalen
251 - 300 -- Ross
301 - 350 -- legolambda
351 - 400 -- Jan
401 - 450 -- zeke creek
451 - 500
 
501 - 550 -- Marie
551 - 600
601 - 650 -- Joe Kupe
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850 --Mendo Jim
851 - 900
901 - 950 -- Word Woman
951 - 1,000 -- Maggie Strasser
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650 
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750 -- B. Haven
2,751 - 3,000 -- Paul
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

Sunday, July 13, 2014

Will's Well-Cooked Sunday Puzzle

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Think of a popular TV show about cooking. I guarantee it's a show everyone has heard of. Remove the second and third letters of the first word and insert them after the first letter of the second word. You'll get a phrase for a different kind of cooking. What is it?
Have you cooked up an answer? We have. Yup, you guessed it:
A NO-HINTS PUZZLE
You remember the rules: if I detect a clue or hint in your comment, it'll get pulled. Go to Blaine's blog for that sort of thing.

But first! Go to NPR's Contact Us page, which will serve the answer you cooked up.

I love Flickr. I typed in "cooking" as the word du jour, and got lots of photos of New Zealand (Mt. Cook) and the Cook Islands. Guaranteed not to make you hungry, although you might want to find your passport!













Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing or a contribution in the winner's honor to the Red Cross.

Interestingly, I predicted last Sunday that we'd be talking about a range near 2,000. I wasn't far off--"around 1,900 entries" according to Arun, our fill-in host. (Anyone else wonder what these people look like? Here's Arun's NPR page.) Nevertheless, I and most everyone else guessed too low, so no winner. This week's puzzle isn't quite so immediately obvious. Go ahead, pick a range.

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600." We retain the discretion to award the prize to an entrant who picked the adjacent range (e.g., 601-650) if that entrant had not already won a prize. In the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of January, 2014, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do..

Saturday, July 12, 2014

Saturday is the New Thursday (Just This Once)

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name a famous actress of the past whose last name has 5 letters. Move the middle letter to the end to name another famous actress of the past. Who are these actresses?
This was not hard. In fact, it was bizarrely easy. Think of a famous actress of the past...and your first guess might easily be Greta GARBO. Move the R to the end, and you get the GABOR sisters: Magda, Eva & Zsa Zsa. Yes, they weren't great actresses, but they were famous. As Wiki points out, they were famous for the number of their marriages: nineteen (or twenty, if you count the illegal one) among the trio.

Someone wanted Thunder as the word of the week. We can get behind that!













Time for

Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700 -- Maggie Strasser
701 - 750 -- legolambda
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- Natasha
1,051 - 1,100 -- KDW
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250 -- Phil
1,251 - 1,300 -- Ross
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 -- Curtis
1,401 - 1,450 -- Magdalen
1,451 - 1,500 -- Paul

1,501 - 1,550 -- David
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650 
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800 -- zeke creek
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000 -- B. Haven
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750 -- Word Woman
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250 -- Joe Kupe
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Power Restored!

This is not an official post, and not the official Thursday post for the Greta GARBO --> Eva/Zsa Zsa GABOR puzzle.

We had a power outage on Tuesday that lasted until tonight (just over 48 hours), so I'm a bit behind on the computing. Tomorrow, I promise!

Sunday, July 6, 2014

That Duck Might Be Somebody's Mother...

 Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name a famous actress of the past whose last name has 5 letters. Move the middle letter to the end to name another famous actress of the past. Who are these actresses?
Ross got this immediately, the show-off. (Well, it is easy.)

You all got it immediately too, so I'm providing this link to NPR's Contact Us form merely to be funny.

You know what else is super easy? Guessing what the word of the week is! (Don't forget to ask for a word for Thursday's blog post.)













I hope you were all humming The Stars and Stripes Forever march by John Philip Sousa ("Be kind to your web-footed friends...") as you looked at the pretty pictures.

Time for



This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed. The winner gets a puzzle book of our choosing or a contribution in the winner's honor to the Red Cross.

No one picked the actual range this week. Mendo Jim is our resident historian, so I'll ask this of him specifically and everyone else generally: When did "just over 1,500 entries" seem high? Put another way, I can recall when that was a pretty mainstream range to pick. Was that years and years ago, or more recent, say since 2010?
 
Regardless of when it got unpopular to enter the actual puzzle, this week is REALLY easy! Be sure to enter the Pick a Range for this week's SUPER easy puzzle--who knows, maybe we'll be talking about a range around 2,000 next Sunday!

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600." We retain the discretion to award the prize to an entrant who picked the adjacent range (e.g., 601-650) if that entrant had not already won a prize. In the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of January, 2014, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do..

Thursday, July 3, 2014

Bad Breath? Try Colgate!

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Name a boy's name and a girl's name, each in four letters. The names start with the same letter of the alphabet. The boy's name contains the letter R. Drop that R from the boy's name and insert it into the girl's name. Phonetically, the result will be a familiar two-word phrase for something no one wants to have. What is it?
As we said, not hard. BRAD - R and BETH + R = BAD BREATH

Now, why didn't Will Shortz run this puzzle BEFORE offering us a name brand of toothpaste?

Here's what Flickr offers for "bad breath":













Time for

Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150 -- Paul
151 - 200
201 - 250 -- Natasha
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400 -- Ross
401 - 450
451 - 500 -- Phil
 
501 - 550 -- Joe Kupe
551 - 600
601 - 650 -- Word Woman
651 - 700
701 - 750 -- Magdalen
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900 -- B. Haven
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150 -- zeke creek
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 -- Curtis
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650 
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000 -- legolambda
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).