Sunday, August 31, 2014

Before and After Solving

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Think of a word that means "to come before." Replace its last letter with two new letters to get "someone who comes after you." These two words are unrelated etymologically. What words are they?
Hmmm. The first word I thought of didn't work. Time to hand it off to Ross. Ah, okay, we have an answer. I don't think anyone will be confused about what constitutes hinting in this one.

You didn't need to hand it off to anyone--or, perhaps, someone handed it off to you. In any case, you've solved it and need only send the answers in. For you, my friend, I present the NPR Contact Us form for just that purpose.

I used BEFORE as the word o' the day. Lots of "before and after" shots, but I resisted all but one. Enjoy!














Time for


This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor. As of this week, we are providing an alternative to the Red Cross. If the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.

Four hundred was the magic number, which means Maggie Strasser wins. What's YOUR guess for next week?

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600." We retain the discretion to award the prize to an entrant who picked the adjacent range (e.g., 601-650) if that entrant had not already won a prize. In the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of January, 2014, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do..

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Thank U, U Thant

Here's this week's Sunday NPR puzzle:
Name a world leader of the 1960s — two words. Change the last letter of the second word. Then switch the order of the words — that is, putting the second word in front. The result will name a hit song of the 1990s. Who is the leader, and what is the song?
I used the answer as the title for this post, but in case you never look at the title, here it is U THANT - T + K = U THANK => THANK U

I guess the thinking is: if you're too young to have heard of or remember U Thant (former Secretary General of the United Nations) then you've heard of Alanis Morisette and her song.

From the Wikipedia entry on U Thant:
"U" is an honorific in Burmese, roughly equal to "Mr". "Thant" was his only name, per Burmese convention. In Burmese, he was known as Pantanaw U Thant, in reference to his hometown, Pantanaw.

And from the Wiki entry on Alanis Morisette (really, Will should make a puzzle out of how many letters are doubled in her name, i.e., only one):
"Thank U", the album's only major international hit single, was nominated for the 2000 Grammy Award for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance; the music video, which featured Morissette nude, generated mild controversy.
Did you notice how Wiki didn't link to the music video? Well, I'm not going to either.

Let's see what "thank" gets us over at Flickr. For some reason, when Flickr photographers want to thank us, they say it with flowers...which mysteriously prompted me to pick only two floral tributes!













Time for


Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50 -- Joe Kupe
 51 - 100 -- Curtis
101 - 150 -- KDW
151 - 200 -- Ross
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400 -- Maggie Strasser
401 - 450 -- zeke creek
451 - 500 -- Magdalen
 
501 - 550 -- David
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750 -- B. Haven
751 - 800
801 - 850 -- Mendo Jim
851 - 900 -- Phil
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry B.W.
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650 
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

Sunday, August 24, 2014

Flown the Coop

Here's this week's Sunday NPR puzzle:
Name a world leader of the 1960s — two words. Change the last letter of the second word. Then switch the order of the words — that is, putting the second word in front. The result will name a hit song of the 1990s. Who is the leader, and what is the song?
I got this in my usual haphazard fashion: I thought of a name, manipulated it and lo! I had the right answer.

NO HINTS! This means "if I think it's a hint, it's out." If you've solved the puzzle, you'll know which hints--a plethora, to be sure--I'm talking about.

But do, by all means, submit your answer using the NPR Contact Us form I've cleverly linked to right here.

If I use "Cooperstown" as the word for this week, I get a lot (A LOT) of bronze plaques from the Baseball Hall of Fame. So I've used Otsego (the name of the lake, and the county, associated with Cooperstown) instead. (There are some gorgeous, non-baseball-specific, Cooperstown photos on Flickr that I can't use because they're not Creative Commons. Please go look at them by clicking on this link.)














Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor. As of this week, we are providing an alternative to the Red Cross. If the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.
Linda Wertheimer (I love her voice; click to see what she looks like) got real specific: 1,000 entries for the Sam Loyd puzzle, and no one picked that. Interesting to hear how many people send in entries for today's puzzle.
Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600." We retain the discretion to award the prize to an entrant who picked the adjacent range (e.g., 601-650) if that entrant had not already won a prize. In the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of January, 2014, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do..

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Bull's Eye? Or a Target Ad?

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
You have a target with six rings, bearing the numbers 16, 17, 23, 24, 39, and 40. How can you score exactly 100 points, by shooting at the target.
This seems so simple: Ignore all the higher numbers. 16 + 17 + 17 = 50. Do that twice and you have 2 x 50. So, hit the 16 twice and the 17 four times and you're at 100.

Henry, Ross and I have spent the past few days in and around Cooperstown, NY (home of the Baseball Hall of Fame). We toured the Ommegang Brewery today. The tour guide said the name, Ommegang, comes from the Flemish for milling around (close enough) because it's an annual festival in Belgium. Here are some photos of ommegang.













Time for

Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300 -- B. Haven
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750 -- LegoLamba
751 - 800
801 - 850 -- zeke creek
851 - 900 -- Phil
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry B.W.
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200 -- Magdalen
1,201 - 1,250 -- Word Woman
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350 -- Curtis
1,351 - 1,400 -- Maggie Strasser
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500 -- Ross

1,501 - 1,550 -- Joe Kupe
1,551 - 1,600 -- KDW
1,601 - 1,650 
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000 -- Marie
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150 -- Mendo Jim
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

Sunday, August 17, 2014

Ready. Aim. ADD!

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
You have a target with six rings, bearing the numbers 16, 17, 23, 24, 39, and 40. How can you score exactly 100 points, by shooting at the target.
I find it odd that there's no "using the fewest arrows" clause to this puzzle. Anyway, we have an answer. Or, to give credit where credit is due, Henry has an answer. He's visiting us for the weekend.

And because you went to elementary school and can add, you also have an answer, which is my cue to offer you this link to NPR's Contact Us page so that you can mostly easily send in your answer!

As I mentioned, Henry's here. I asked him for the Photo Section word, and he gave me URDE (also URDY and URDEE) which in heraldry means pointed. Even with all three spellings I couldn't get six photos, so I added URDU. Henry likes his little jokes.














Time for


This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor. As of this week, we are providing an alternative to the Red Cross. If the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.

Ross totally called last week. He said on Wednesday, "What was the winning range from last week because that's what I want this week." 350 won both weeks, so good call Ross. Unfortunately, B. Haven had the same great idea, so B. Haven's choice on Thursday pipped Ross's. B., let us know if you want a book, or a gift to the Red Cross or your NPR station.

And now the question is: how big a range do you all want this week?


Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600." We retain the discretion to award the prize to an entrant who picked the adjacent range (e.g., 601-650) if that entrant had not already won a prize. In the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of January, 2014, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do..

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Would the Real La Bamba Please Say Baa?

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Name a well-known movie of the past — two words, seven letters in total. These seven letters can be rearranged to spell the name of an animal plus the sound it makes. What animal is it?
As far as we know, the intended correct answer is LA BAMBA = LAMB + BAA.

Now, would you clue that as a movie? Or a song? Or both? Cluing it as both makes it WAY too easy. And a song title would seem to be too hard. But saying it's a foreign language song makes it too easy. Enh, it is what it is.

Here's a link to the original Ritchie Valens version. Or, if you prefer, the Los Lobos version, complete with scenes from the movie.

Let's look at some lambs, shall we?













Time for

Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50 -- Curtis
 51 - 100
101 - 150 -- Ross
151 - 200 -- Word Woman
201 - 250 -- David
251 - 300 -- LegoLabamba
301 - 350 -- B. Haven
351 - 400 -- Magdalen
401 - 450 -- Mendo Jim
451 - 500 -- Paul
 
501 - 550 -- Joe Kupe
551 - 600
601 - 650 -- Maggie Strasser
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850 -- Phil
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650 
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

Sunday, August 10, 2014

Old MacDonald Had a Puzzle

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Name a well-known movie of the past — two words, seven letters in total. These seven letters can be rearranged to spell the name of an animal plus the sound it makes. What animal is it?
Not immediately obvious, that's all I can say. Wait, I stand corrected. Ross solved it without difficulty. (He's smarter than I am.)

And YOU are smarter than I am, without a doubt. You merely need the link to NPR's speechless Contact Us form, which is here.

In case anyone else was confused by Mendo Jim's reference in the comments to Thursday's post, I found this (which I think is right?) blog, "Letters to Nowhere," referencing a Reader's Digest book, How to Live with Life.

As I was Googling "pretty damn seldom" I discovered that there are Flickr photos with that as the search term.  I've linked to them because only two are Creative Commons:





Let's try "seldom" --









Very rocky!

Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor. As of this week, we are providing an alternative to the Red Cross. If the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.

KDW guessed 350, which was the number given on NPR this morning. Let us know, KDW, if you want a book, or a gift to the Red Cross or your NPR station. (Ross received a bumper sticker from the last NPR station we sent money to because of this game. I sense a lot of bumper stickers in our future!)

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600." We retain the discretion to award the prize to an entrant who picked the adjacent range (e.g., 601-650) if that entrant had not already won a prize. In the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of January, 2014, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do..

Thursday, August 7, 2014

When Kissing Flowers, Tulips are Better

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Take the name of a modern-day country. Add an "A" and rearrange all the letters to name a group of people who used to live in the area of this country. Who are they?
I made a fatal mistake in trying to solve this. I assumed--quite wrongly--that the country couldn't have too many letters. Hah! The answer is [The] NETHERLANDS + A = NEANDERTHALS

Okay, so a couple points of interest. I gather there are some tangential references to "rotter" and then "rotterdam" in the comments on Sunday's post. I don't see that as impermissible hinting, mainly because they arose by my referring to Ross (who did solve the puzzle) as a rotter. Just to restate my rule on NO HINTING: if the hint is so broad that I notice it (and you've seen, I'm not exactly eagle-eyed), then it's illegal.

Next, I gather there's a whole social life going on among our most regular of regulars. Love it!

Finally, and lastly, Blogger hates Mendo Jim. How else can one explain the tendency for Blogger to snatch up his comments (and his alone) as spam. Mind you, the spam feature DOES catch actual spam. A lot of it, as it happens. It also grabs MJ's posts. Our apologies, MJ. Please continue to comment, and please continue to contact us when your comments don't appear.

Curtis has asked for Flickr images based on, and I quote, "the foliage that many folks heavily associate with the puzzle country, or at least with one region of [The Netherlands]." Really not sure what foliage you're thinking of, unless it's pot. No, I stand corrected. It's TULIPS! (Silly me. I read "foliage" and thought of leaves, not flowers.)

Here ya go!













Time for


Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50 -- Curtis
 51 - 100
101 - 150 -- Ross
151 - 200 -- legolambda
201 - 250 -- Magdalen
251 - 300 -- zeke creek
301 - 350 -- KDW
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500 -- Paul
 
501 - 550 -- David
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850 -- Word Woman
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- Mendo Jim
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650 
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

Sunday, August 3, 2014

Pick a Country, Any Country...

Here's this week's NPR Puzzle:
Take the name of a modern-day country. Add an "A" and rearrange all the letters to name a group of people who used to live in the area of this country. Who are they?
Interesting. That's a new twist to the traditional "take a country" puzzle. Let's see if Ross has solved it... (Not yet.)

You have, you clever thing. Here's your reward: a convenient link to NPR's delicate Contact Us form, so you may send in that answer tout suite.

Paul wants to know if there are any Flickr pictures generated from the word EQUIPOISE. And simply by his asking the question, I now want to know as well!














Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor. As of this week, we are providing an alternative to the Red Cross. If the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.

Ross had 1,500 so he "wins." (I won't tell you what his special prize pack is, although it includes the option to have no prize at all.) I think this week is way harder, so who knows how many will send in an answer?

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600." We retain the discretion to award the prize to an entrant who picked the adjacent range (e.g., 601-650) if that entrant had not already won a prize. In the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of January, 2014, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do..