Thursday, October 30, 2014

Igor, Commit a Felony!

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Name a well-known TV actress of the past. Put an R between her first and last names. Then read the result backward. The result will be an order Dr. Frankenstein might give to Igor. Who is the actress, and what is the order?
Okay, I admit it--we cheated. Really cheated. We let Henry solve the puzzle for us. Anyway, the answer is (again) Eva Gabor which, with an R inserted and reversed, reads ROB A GRAVE.

Happy Halloween!

I've decided that today's word is EXQUISITE. (Because haven't we all had enough pumpkin spice recently?)













Time for




Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250 -- Ross
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450
451 - 500 -- Magdalen
 
501 - 550 -- Word Woman
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950 -- legolambda
951 - 1,000 -- David
1,001 - 1,050 -- Mendo Jim
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry B.W.
1,101 - 1,150 -- Paul
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350 -- B.Haven
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450 -- zeke creek
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950 -- Joe Kupe
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

Sunday, October 26, 2014

What Would Dr. Frankenstein Order Igor to Do?

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Name a well-known TV actress of the past. Put an R between her first and last names. Then read the result backward. The result will be an order Dr. Frankenstein might give to Igor. Who is the actress, and what is the order?
Now, that's an unexpected puzzle! And we haven't solved it. In fact, I'll admit to having procrastinated A LOT to avoid solving it. Let me get back to you...like on Thursday.

You, of course, have solved it. Want the link to the NPR Contact Us form? Here it is!

We had a request for MOONDANCE as the photo word o' the day. (Want to see the prettiest rights-reserved photo? It's this one of Alsace, France.) Let's see what we get:













Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor. As of this week, we are providing an alternative to the Red Cross. If the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.

Joe Kupe won with 190 entries. And next week? Well, we clearly have NO IDEA. (Yet.)

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600." We retain the discretion to award the prize to an entrant who picked the adjacent range (e.g., 601-650) if that entrant had not already won a prize. In the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of January, 2014, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do..

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Did I Get This Right?

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Out of a regular grade school classroom, two students are chosen at random. Both happen to have blue eyes. If the odds are exactly 50-50 that two randomly chosen students in the class will have blue eyes: How many students are in the class?
I will show you how I arrive at FOUR as my answer:

Our class has Archie, Betty, Charlie and Davy in it. Archie has BROWN eyes, the rest have BLUE eyes. Any pair with Archie in it goes in one group, all Archie-less pairs in the other group. As long as the two groups are precisely the same size, we're good to go.

A-B, A-C, A-D vs. B-C, B-D, C-D

Does it work for other numbers? I have no idea. Here's where someone else can send me the proof and I'll insert it for everyone's edification.

Here are our classmates (plus two more photos, just because they came up when I searched for "brown eye boy"):














Time for



Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100 -- Paul
101 - 150 -- Word Woman
151 - 200 -- Joe Kupe
201 - 250 -- Ross
251 - 300 -- Magdalen
301 - 350 -- B.Haven
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450 -- Phil
451 - 500
 
501 - 550 -- legolambda
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750 -- zeke creek
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry B.W.
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350 -- Mendo Jim
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).


Sunday, October 19, 2014

Hint: It's a REGULAR Grade School Classroom

Before I get to this week's puzzle, a word about the Country - Capital - Country puzzle from last week. Interesting that three of our four answers were allowed by the Puzzle Master. As Ross commented, Will Shortz must have disallowed Aruba, which "is a country the way Scotland is a country--it's a sovereign territory." Fair enough, Puzzle Master. I'm sure the nice peoples of the Solomon Islands cheered when they heard your shout out to their capital, Honiara!

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Out of a regular grade school classroom, two students are chosen at random. Both happen to have blue eyes. If the odds are exactly 50-50 that two randomly chosen students in the class will have blue eyes: How many students are in the class?
I think this takes some paper and pencil. Oh, and this handy list of children's names in alpha order:

Abigail                               Kevin                           Uriah
Billy                                   Laura                           Vanessa
Carol                                  Maureen                      Willie
Diane                                 Nick                            Xerxes
Eddie                                 Olive                           Yancy
Fred                                   Petey                          Zenobia
Gladys                               Quincy
Hector                               Richie
Imogen                              Sally
Jane                                   Ted

We have an answer, which we haven't bothered to prove is the only answer. I trust Martin Gardner did that in the first place. Oh, and if you want a much harder puzzle, check out this blue-eyed monster over at XKCD.

Oh, and don't forget to send in your answers using the gray-eyed Contact Us form right here.

Let's see what Flickr has for HONIARA...














Time for



This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor. As of this week, we are providing an alternative to the Red Cross. If the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.

I won this week, with 500. So let me ask you...how many people will want to work out the maths for the blue-eyed puzzle?

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600." We retain the discretion to award the prize to an entrant who picked the adjacent range (e.g., 601-650) if that entrant had not already won a prize. In the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of January, 2014, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do..

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Honiara Where--?

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Name a certain country. Change one letter in its name to a new letter and rearrange the result to name another country's capital. Then change one letter in that and rearrange the result to name another country. What geographical names are these?
I promised you FOUR answers. You get to guess which one was the intended one.

The mostly European, everyone's heard of theses places, answer:
SPAIN -- PARIS -- SYRIA
The so easy, did Will Shortz mean this one, answer:
IRAQ -- RIGA -- IRAN
The delightfully elegant and it uses a non-Iraqi Q! answer:
ARUBA -- RABAT -- QATAR
And finally, the so obscure it's way cool plus long answer:
ROMANIA -- HONIARA (capital of the Solomon Islands) -- BAHRAIN
Did you get them all? And will Will announce them all? Join us on Sunday to find out!

Here's what I got with "Empire State Marathon" on Flickr. No runners, but a steam train for Henry!










Time for


Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350 -- B.Haven
351 - 400 -- Maggie Strasser
401 - 450 --Alex B.
451 - 500 -- Magdalen
 
501 - 550 -- Joe Kupe
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750 -- Word Woman
751 - 800
801 - 850 -- Ross
851 - 900 -- zeke creek
901 - 950 -- legolambda
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry B.W.
1,101 - 1,150 --Paul
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

Sunday, October 12, 2014

Pick Yet Another Country...

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Name a certain country. Change one letter in its name to a new letter and rearrange the result to name another country's capital. Then change one letter in that and rearrange the result to name another country. What geographical names are these?
If I say we haven't solved it yet, it's only that we haven't started yet. But you know how it is with these "pick a country" puzzles. You Wiki a list of countries and go from there...

Edited to add: Ross wrote a program to find ALL the answers. Yes, folks, there are four answers that we believe meet the puzzle parameters. Can you find them all???

And you know how it is when you've solved the puzzle. You submit your answer using this cleverly concealed Contact Us form.

It's been a quiet week here in Lake Woebegon Northeast Pennsylvania. No, no stories--that's what a quiet week means.

Word Woman asked for "tour des 300 metres" as the word of the day, so here (finally!) it is:













Time for


This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor. As of this week, we are providing an alternative to the Red Cross. If the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.

zeke creek won this week, with 1230 as the magic number. I know most of you thought the puzzle easier than that. And this week? What do you think?

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600." We retain the discretion to award the prize to an entrant who picked the adjacent range (e.g., 601-650) if that entrant had not already won a prize. In the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of January, 2014, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do..


Thursday, October 9, 2014

Rock-and-Roller Cola Wars

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Take the first four letters of a brand of toothpaste plus the last five letters of an over-the-counter medicine, and together, in order, the result will name a popular beverage. What is it?
We assume we have the right answer: PEPSodent + RICOLA = PEPSI-COLA

Nobody calls it Pepsi-Cola, of course, but for some reason using the full name made me think of the "cola wars" lyric in Billy Joel's "We Didn't Start the Fire." (Sorry for the ear worm, folks.) The Wiki page for the song is a veritable font of information, including how the song came about and what Joel himself thinks about it.

Unrelated completely from the puzzle, I've selected SPLENDID as the word of the day. I'm surprised, honestly, that the word doesn't yield a treasure trove of awesome photos. Still, I only need six. (Oh, dear. I was supposed to use "tour des 300 metres" as the Word of the Day. WW, I promise, I will use it on Sunday. Promise!)













Time for

Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- Ross
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250 -- zeke creek
1,251 - 1,300 -- legolambda
1,301 - 1,350 -- Curtis
1,351 - 1,400 -- Maggie Strasser
1,401 - 1,450 -- Magdalen
1,451 - 1,500 -- Joe Kupe

1,501 - 1,550 -- Word Woman
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650 -- B.Haven
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050 -- David
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

Sunday, October 5, 2014

On the Cusp of OTC

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Take the first four letters of a brand of toothpaste plus the last five letters of an over-the-counter medicine, and together, in order, the result will name a popular beverage. What is it?
Ross got it using common sense. (What a cheater!) As you'll see in a minute, he also won the Pick a Range for last week, so we're officially annoyed at Ross. (Not really.)

You've also gotten it immediately, and need only a link to the shy and retiring Contact Us form that NPR supplies for submitting your answer.

I asked Ross what the word of the day should be. "Amnesia." I check, and there's a strip club by that name, so all the photos...well, you get the idea. "Mnemonic," is Ross's back up plan. Now I get lots of pictures of a band by that name, and also, weirdly, Keanu Reeves in (I assume) The Matrix. Ross's third pick is the charm: PARABOLA















Time for


This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor. As of this week, we are providing an alternative to the Red Cross. If the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.

Ross won with "1300" as the magic number. This week may be just as easy. What do YOU think?

Here are the ranges:
Fewer than 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600." We retain the discretion to award the prize to an entrant who picked the adjacent range (e.g., 601-650) if that entrant had not already won a prize. In the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of January, 2014, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do..

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Mister Cellophane Makes a Call

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Think of a 10-letter word that names an invention of the early 20th century and includes an A and an O. Remove the A. Then move the O to where the A was, leaving a space where the O was, and you'll name a much more recent invention. What is it?
Rather easy--I did it in reverse. I thought of a more recent invention in two words (three words in nine letters seemed unlikely) and worked backwards. At first I thought of cars, but it's clear the A disappears. Then phones. Bingo! The correct answer is CELLOPHANE which becomes CELL PHONE.

I asked Ross for a word for today's photo montage. Perhaps in response to the riot of autumnal colors here, he picked CERULEAN. There is a bird and a butterfly by that name. I went with the pretty blue color, though.













Time for


Here are this week's picks:
Fewer than 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500
 
501 - 550
551 - 600 -- Joe Kupe
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850 -- legolambda
851 - 900
901 - 950 -- zekecreek
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200 -- Magdalen
1,201 - 1,250 -- Word Woman
1,251 - 1,300 -- Ross
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 -- Curtis
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500 -- Mendo Jim

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650 
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).