Thursday, January 22, 2015

It's Da Gong!

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Name two animals, both mammals, one of them domestic, the other wild. Put their letters together, and rearrange the result to name another mammal, this one wild, and not seen naturally around North America. What mammal is it?
We did use a list and some perl code to create all the options. The winner is DOG + GNU = DUGONG, which frankly we thought was interchangeable with the manatee, commonly found in the waters around Florida. We were wrong.

Here's the word of the day: GNU














Time for

Here are this week's picks:
Zero and fewer
    1 - 50
 51 - 100 -- Mendo Jim
101 - 150 -- B. Haven
151 - 200 -- Alex B.
201 - 250 -- Word Woman
251 - 300 -- legolambda
301 - 350 -- David
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450 -- Magdalen
451 - 500

501 - 550 -- Ross
551 - 600
601 - 650 -- Margaret G.
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry BW
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

On an entirely unrelated note, albeit one appropriate for a puzzle blog (I hope), has anyone followed the Cicada 3301 puzzles for the last three years? Has anyone here ever tried any of them?

I've glanced at these puzzles, and if I ever feel a bloated head because of success on WS's puzzles, the three published challenges by Cicada 3301 quickly remove any arrogance I might feel.

I don't submit puzzle answers except when I know WS's answer and have a better one that I strongly suspect he'll reject (and hence haven't submitted this year), but I'd love to hear someone ask the world's only person with a degree in enigmatology about these puzzles.

Just curious,

Phil

Mendo Jim said...

As I admitted a couple of weeks ago, I sometimes have trouble solving the simplest anagrams. I am pretty sure all three animals appeared on my radar.
My Range guess seems unlikely.

On the other hand Phil's Cricket puzzle looks like a snap, easier at least than getting CAPTCHA to give me a code to enter.

Curtis said...

Okay, this is one of the few times I failed to solve the puzzle. But, now that I see the answer, I'm thinking, "oh, for the love of Dog, no one got that!!"

legolambda said...

Mendo Jim,

If "dugong" appears on your radar, that's some pretty hifalutin' radar! I agree with Curtis. I think your range guess seems likely.

LegongLambda

Paul said...

Hi, Magdalen, Ross, Mimi, Henry.
I doubt that anyone's ever taken a picture of OVERCEREBRATION, but I thought I'd ask, anyway.