Thursday, March 19, 2015

How Do You Know Jesus and Aesop Were Different People? Were They Ever Seen Together?

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Parables of Jesus is an old collection of stories. Remove three of the 15 letters in this phrase and rearrange the 12 letters that remain to get another old collection of stories. What is it?
So we all solved this in split seconds, but still...The answer is AESOP'S FABLES. Also in the fabulously rich history of storytelling.

Here's what "fable" gets you in photos:













Before the Pick a Range picks, a quick word from your hosts. We may be late with the blog post on Sunday. Maybe even very late on Sunday. But fear not, we'll post something eventually. [We're off to Mohonk for a knitting retreat weekend (me) and a guitar retreat weekend of one (Ross).]

Time for



Here are this week's picks:
Zero and fewer
    1 - 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400 -- Maggie Strasser
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550 -- Natasha
551 - 600
601 - 650 -- Joe Kupe
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry BW
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250 -- Magdalen
1,251 - 1,300 -- Margaret G.
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 -- Curtis
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500 -- Ross

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650 -- legolambda
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050 -- B. Haven
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750 -- Word Woman
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

My search for a solution other than the intended one was more interesting (to me) than the puzzle itself. Since we were looking for "another old collection of stories," I thought of a building.

I was hoping to find a way to get the name of a multi-story building from the letters. Alas, I failed. But I did find a different "collection of stories." It's Ausable Press, which is no defunct.

This press published primarily poetry, but it still seems to me that a publisher can be called a collection of stories.

Phil

Henry BW said...

You know you have collected too many tall stories when the FAA tells you that you are a hazard to aircraft and need a flashing red light on top. (I remember that one from 50 years ago.)

legolambda said...

Just for the record, the clue I gave for this puzzle over at Blaine's puzzle blog was: "I have this week's answer bookmarked."

As you can all infer, one of the blogs in my bookmarks/favorites list is An Englishman Solves American Puzzles. Its acronym is AESAP, which echoes AESOP.

legoAnEntertainingStoryOfParallellity

Anonymous said...

Lego,

If only we all lived in Oregon, Ohio, Oslo, and Orleans (not the new one)!

Phil