Thursday, April 16, 2015

Brought to You By the Guild of Prompt Promoters

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Think of a job, in 8 letters, that names someone who might work with actors. Change one letter in this to the following letter of the alphabet to name another person who works with actors. What jobs are these?
I have the distinct luxury of not solving the puzzle, knowing that my brilliant husband will. And he did: PROMOTER - O + P = PROMPTER. Do promoters work with actors? Maybe. Who knows. Who cares. (Or, Ross got the answer wrong.)

Sometimes when I go to the Flickr well, it's dry. I've asked for an obscure word, there's a band by that name whose photos clog the search, something. Other times, I go and it's incredible. Today is in that latter category. I typed in April and had a dozen photos before I knew it. After culling out the ones with the photographer's name/website as a watermark on the photo (I don't begrudge them the stamp, but it's a bit counter-intuitive with the Creative Commons license), here's what I have for you today.













Time for



Here are this week's picks:
Zero and fewer
    1 - 50 -- Joe Kupe
 51 - 100 -- Curtis
101 - 150 -- Mendo Jim
151 - 200 -- Word Woman
201 - 250 -- Margaret G.
251 - 300 -- B. Haven
301 - 350 -- Legolambda
351 - 400 -- Maggie Strasser
401 - 450 -- Magdalen
451 - 500

501 - 550 -- Natasha
551 - 600
601 - 650 -- Ross
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry BW
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

7 comments:

legolambda said...

Looking at our ranges, except for David and Henry BW (and Ross, kinda), we thought this one was pretty tough. It was. This puzzle's range might go under 100 correct responses.

I liked this puzzle. WS has been on a good roll, lately, IMO.

LegoWillophile

Anonymous said...

In my comments earlier in the week I mentioned that there might be a better job connection for promoter and prompter than actor.
I think professional wrestlers enjoy their use to a greater extent.
Prompters? Gasp!

OK, five or more tries. Let's try the anon route past M Capt

Mendo Jim

Joe Kupe said...

We went with Seamster and Teamster! Seamster is a real word and is someone who sews the actors costumes and a Teamster is a union employee who writes or produces TV shows. Lets see what the QM thinks!

Word Woman said...

Joe, I like it!

legolambda said...

Joe Kupe,

If Will Shortz does not accept your fine seamster/teamster entry I shall no longer be his "esteemster!" He should mention this creative anser on-air.

LegoButI'mProbablyADreamster

Ross Beresford said...

I just donated $10 to WVIA (which is also our NPR station) in honor of Paul's Pick a Range win last week.

Joe Kupe said...

Word Woman and legolamda, thanks for your support! We shall see tomorrow!