Sunday, May 3, 2015

In the Kitchen With Will...

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Think of a common two-word phrase for something you might see in a kitchen. Reverse the words — that is, put the second word in front of the first — and you'll name a food, in one word, that you might prepare in a kitchen. What is it?
Here's my question (which I hope you can answer without giving the puzzle answer away): Has he used this before? It seems...kind of basic.

Okay, regardless of whether it's a retread, you've solved it (wow, you're fast!) and you're tapping your fingers, waiting for this delightfully domesticated NPR Contact Us form to send in your answer.

Let's see what "May" brings to the photo section, shall we?













Time for



This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Or skip the comments and send an email with your pick to Magdalen (at) Crosswordman (dot) com. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor. As of this week, we are providing an alternative to the Red Cross. If the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.

Over 750 entries for the thespian-rich Hopkins/Perkins/Hopper puzzle. No winner this week, but we have to mail out Margaret G.'s puzzle book from last week. Are we going up or down in "degree of difficulty" as we move on to the kitchen? Pick a range based on your guess, or by shooting a dart at the chart, your choice.

Here are the ranges:
Zero and fewer
  1 - 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600." We retain the discretion to award the prize to an entrant who picked the adjacent range (e.g., 601-650) if that entrant had not already won a prize. In the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of January, 2014, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do.

35 comments:

Word Woman said...

3001-3250.

Welcome back, M and R!

Anonymous said...

More than 5000 and a new record.

Mendo Jim

Mendo Jim said...

I submitted 5000 and a new record.
It appeared then disappeared.

legolambda said...

751-800 for me this week, please. Thank you. That is the range that would have won last week. I came as close as I ever have with my 701-750 pick. As it was, Joe Kupe (801-850) and I sandwiched the correct "more than 750" actual number of correct entries.

I would have won if this were "The Pick is Right" and if Ross and Magdalen were Bob Barker and Drew Carey.

Oh well, perhaps this week I will "win some fabulous prizes, Johnnie Olsen."

Legoodson&Todman

Natasha said...

951-1000 range, please.

Unknown said...

2501-2750 please. --Margaret G.

Anonymous said...

Apparently, I got last week's question wrong. My answer: Anthony Hopkins, Anthony Perkins, Hedda Hopper. Oh well. I have trouble knowing who's famous, whether a famous actor must be more famous for acting than for being a columnist, and so forth.

Phil

Word Woman said...

Phil, you must be devastated. I also considered submitting two different Dennis Hopper actor progeny, Henry Hopper, and, the lesser known, Grass Hopper.

WW

Word Woman said...

Phil, you must be devastated. I also considered submitting two different Dennis Hopper actor progeny, Henry Hopper, and, the lesser known, Grass Hopper.

WW

Anonymous said...

Word Woman? Is that really you? The only person who's called me Grass Hopper was the adverbial Bruce Lee.

Phil

Word Woman said...

Phil, that was you?!

Word Woman said...

Phil, that was you?!

Anonymous said...

I'm at a loss for a pun now. And in response to your second comment, WW, I'm at loss for a pun now. Maybe I'll just go to the kitchen and make everything I can think of until the answer to the puzzle is before me. I think I'll start with potcoffee, follow it up with spoonsoup, and then try a little ovenmicrowave. That last one is a family recipe my great grandmother brought over from the old country, by which I naturally mean The Searchers.

See? I got nothing.

Phil

Word Woman said...

Phil, it's just an 'N' away from puny to punny. Put that in your ovenmicrowave and smoke it ;-).

David said...

1001 to 1050, please.

Richard said...

1401 to 1450, please. We're going down in degree of difficulty, surely.

Anonymous said...

Word Woman, I'm afraid the ovenmicrowave has been eaten. But I'm currently roasting a strainerspaghetti and will soon be boiling a basterturkey, so if you're in the neighborhood and hungry, stop by. (The cuttercookie was a disappointment.)

On a serious note, I have the answer to this week's puzzle. I was on the wrong track with Zsa Zsa Gabor. The answer is Eva. It was extra tricky since both of them were in my kitchen. (The third one was there too, but I don't know Magda's name.) I finally figured it out while rotating my digital clock.

Phil

legolambda said...

Good stuff, Phil.
LegoLaughing

Word Woman said...

E plurilightrail unum, Phil.

Anonymous said...

WW, I don't need transportation as long as I'm comfortably seated on my ip sofa cto, but thanks for the offer.

Phil

Word Woman said...

Phil, you are the penultimate space cadet.

In dais,
WW

Henry BW said...

My usual 1051-1100, please.

It will be interesting to see how they handle the alternative answers, since the structure demonstrated by Phil and WordWoman allows for an indefinite, and probably large, number of sensible but boring answers. Is there such a thing as a bread spoon?

Anonymous said...

I was wondering what the "record" in "5000 and a record" is, perhaps a little late.
Then reCAPTCHA refused a bunch of times to let me post ir, so I googled reCAPtCHA and found out it is a google invention that is perfect in all its aspects.
Bullcrap.

Mendo Jim, loving that the robot beater likes anon better

Joe Kupe said...

I'll go with the 801 - 850 for a second week in a row.

Curtis said...

How about 1,351 - 1,400 this week?

Curtis said...

How about 1,351 - 1,400 this week?

legolambda said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
legolambda said...

I have just posted on Puzzleria!’s Comments Section (May 6 at 8:20 PM) six alternative answers to this week’s NPR puzzle.

One answer involves Amos Alonzo Stagg; another, Tuesday Weld; another, one-armed bandits;
Another, sleepy relatives; another, moldy food; and another, chick-flicks.

It’s probably prudent not to use any of these at home, or let any of them getting anywhere near your email “send” button. If you have yet solved Will’s puzzle, don’t give up. You can do this.

LegoStick-to-itiveTrumpsAlternative

B. Haven said...

1551-1600, this week please.

This puzzle seems to be easy for the whole family. No knowledge of old films or even chick flicks (or "chick-flicks," as lego lambda mentioned above) required here.

So many duplicate comments? I hope this problem is over.

Anonymous said...

Lego, I once bought an automobile from an ROTC group for only $10. Why so cheap? It had a dead body in the trunk. But once I removed the corpse, my ROTC car became a ROT car, and I used to park it in the kitchen (for quick trips to and from the refrigerator during sporting events on television such as the Westminster Dog Show). At any rate, I had my answer easily enough--which is a good thing since my friend Lon refuses to go anywhere near a kitchen.

Well, enough divulging of answers. I'm off to eat my boxpizza and wash it down with some bagtea.

Henry, before I should go, I have to say that I think my actual answer is pretty boring. I also think it's the intended answer. In fact, I didn't accidentally stumble across anything else that works, even while drinking sour soda from the Midwest.

Phil

Anonymous said...

Ooh, what fun! When I posted my last comment, I had a new form of reCAPTCHA, and it gave me a second answer. I won't say it's a good answer, but it works without as much stretching as, say, the orca fin warmer (well, technically, a muff) that I have in the junk drawer.

Mendo Jim, you're not alone in reCAPTCHA fun.

Phil

Word Woman said...

In that beverage realm, Phil, I wonder if someone has come up with potcoffee to go with Mary Jane's gummy worms?

Word Woman said...

In that beverage realm, Phil, I wonder if someone has come up with potcoffee to go with Mary Jane's gummy worms?

Mendo Jim said...

WW: I always look forward to your comments.
I am glad you are making sure we don't miss them.

Word Woman said...

Ha, Mendo Jim! That uncommanded reposting is getting a bit annoying.

But, I did get to select all the wichsand pictures to prove I am not a robot.