Sunday, June 28, 2015

Singer...or Singer Sewing Machine?

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Name a major American company. Drop its first and last letters, and the remaining letters in order will name a famous singer — both first and last names. What company is it?
Ross and I worked together to solve this one. Sometimes--rarely, but sometimes--two heads are better than one.

You of course barely needed just your one prodigious brain. And you barely even need me to share the NPR Contact Us form. But I will anyway. So there.

Next Saturday is the Fourth of July, so here are some quietly patriotic (or unrelated, I can't tell) Fourth of July photos.

Everything's the Same

just ducky

Heart of the nation.

Child's Play

Fourth of July

Untitled
Time for


This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor. As of this week, we are providing an alternative to the Red Cross. If the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.

Over 1300 entries for I AM A MONARCH = CHAIRMAN MAO. No winner this week, but what do you think will happen with the corporate singer? Pick a range by conning the S&P 500 or shooting a dart at the chart, your choice.

Here are the ranges:
Zero and fewer
  1 - 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600." We retain the discretion to award the prize to an entrant who picked the adjacent range (e.g., 601-650) if that entrant had not already won a prize. In the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of January, 2014, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do.

19 comments:

Word Woman said...

601-650 this week, please.

We'll see.

Word Woman said...
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Maggie Strasser said...

351-400 please. (Sorry Curtis!)

Paul said...

951 - 1,000
Thanks.

Curtis said...

No worries, Maggie; I snoozed, so I loozed. I feel fortunate to have seen the singer in this puzzle at Red Rocks a few years ago on a triple bill. The other two performers on that bill have since left this mortal coil. No intentional clues here. I think I'll take 1,351 - 1,400 this week.

B. Haven said...

701-750 range for this week, please. Have a happy and safe Fourth of July, all.

Mendo Jim said...

The company in question started to do what it does a few years ago close to downtown in our county seat.
To develop its site, it cut down 10 or more beautiful mature redwood trees which had shaded a popular, but undeveloped park.
People who care about such things, myself included, do not patronize this company.

I never got a robot-prover, but got approved anyway.

legolambda said...

Mendo Jim,

Robot prover? I ponder what shape of hoops they would make us hop through to prove we are robots!

Another pretty easy Shortzian offering today. I’ll take 751-800, please. Thanks.

But if anyone needs a nudge, I posted a “piggyback” puzzle to Will’s NPR effort on my Puzzleria! blog. (See AESAP’s “Blogroll.”). My puzzle, which is in the “Comments” section, Jan 28 at 9:59 AM, could well lead one to the solution to Will’s challenge.

Other puzzles on P! this week involve:
A cardboard cube,
An ode to my radio
“Spoons” and combs
And, unlike the NPR puzzle, one of our puzzles involves not a singer but an album, either on vinyl or cassette/eight-track cartridge.

After you are done enjoying Magdalen and Ross’s hospitality, pay us a visit at Puzzleria!

LegoAllGod’sChillin’GottaBeShillin’

Word Woman said...
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Word Woman said...

Prescient, Lego? Posting in Jan ;-). (as opposed to posting by Jan)

legolambda said...

More like "malscient,: Word Woman. Thank you for your gentle proofreading.
I meant to write that my puzzle appears at June 28 at 9:59 AM in Puzzleria!'s Comments section..

Believe me, as as you are well aware, jan needs no help from me or anyone else!

LegoAnyMonthIsAGoodMonthForPostsByjan

legolambda said...

As I am sure most of you AESAP followers are aware, Uson is a Houston-based leak-testing company, but with branch offices in New York City (NYC), and in Urt in both France and Iran. Recently Uson has embarked upon a diversification strategy focusing on Internet Service Providing ISP.

Thus Uson’s revised corporate name on the NASDAQ, Dow, Standard & Poors and Nikkei stock exchanges is: Uson/NYC/Urt/Isp.

That is why I was so flabbergasted to see Maggie, in her June 28 at 12:46 PM comment, spill the proverbial beans by referring to the name of the singer formed when you remove the first and last letters of Uson/NYC/Urt/Isp, namely Sonny Curtis !

Lego:Maggie,BewareTheNPRPoliceAtYourDoorstep!

Word Woman said...

That's one mighty l o n g way to go, Lego, in June or in Jan. . .Reminds me of 200 cats pulling Chairman Mao; it's all in the catnip holders to herd the felines. . .

Word Woman said...
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Word Woman said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
legolambda said...

Word Woman,
Yes, I must admit it. My faux reprimand of Maggie (above) unfolds about as slow as molasses in January, and seems to be about as long as a “All-Day-Dawn-to-Twilight Concert of Various Renditions of Summertime” held on June 21.

LegoCatfishJumpin’OnTheLongestDay

David said...

1001 to 1050, please.

Joe Kupe said...

501 to 550 please. It took until Wednesday night but we got it!

Jay said...

Don't think the singer is that well known, though the company may well be. So we go with 851-900