Thursday, June 4, 2015

Via No Chicken?

Here is this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
A simple challenge: Think of a 5-letter word that can precede "chicken" to complete a common two-word phrase. Change the middle letter to get a new word that can follow "chicken" to complete a common two-word phrase. What phrases are these?
I was in Washington (state) when I linked up with Ross and saw the puzzle. I solved it in under a minute, so it's [chicken] souper easy. (I know. His puns are better.) The answer I came up with is ROAST chicken ROOST. Any alternates of note?

We love the Marx Brothers' "Viaduct? Why a no chicken?" joke from Cocoanuts. Here, then, are some viaducts, including the one that's near here and turning 100 this year.

Tunkhannock Viaduct

Wheel Liberty Viaduct 15/03/2014

Morning Fog at Arthington Viaduct

62005 - Glenfinnan Viaduct

Mithian Viaduct (9)

Porthkerry Viaduct

Time for

Here are this week's picks:
Zero and fewer
    1 - 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450 -- Legolambda
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650 -- Joe Kupe
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800 -- Margaret G.
801 - 850
851 - 900 -- B Haven
901 - 950 -- Natasha
951 - 1,000 -- Mendo Jim
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150 -- Magdalen
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300 -- Paul
1,301 - 1,350 -- Ross
1,351 - 1,400 -- Maggie Strasser
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550 -- Word Woman
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950 -- Anonymous
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

7 comments:

Alex B. said...

I can't find any evidence that CHICKEN ROOST is "common." On the other hand, I can't find anything better.

Anonymous said...

I agree with Alex that "chicken roost" is not the most common of phrases. I also suspect it is the intended answer as it is what first occurred to me. That said, I submitted "crack chicken" and "chicken crock," both of which are more common (according to Google) than "chicken roost."

I also considered another submission that wasn't very good. I won't share it here, but it turned out that one of the two phrases was obscene. I had no idea until I did a search to see how common it was.

Phil

David said...

I don't know how common it is, but there is the phrase "Chickens come home to roost".

Word Woman said...

Perhaps the chickens were actually coming home to roosters!


Mendo Jim said...

Did the Puz webpage (hard to access all week) drop the transcript function?

Ross Beresford said...

Transcript link is there for us.

Mendo Jim said...

Thanks Ross
The transcript is obviously there, but the link to it is on no version of the Puzzle page I can get.
Maybe I've been banned.

CAPT PITA has gone back to a two "word" challenge, one of which is indecipherable 4 times out of 5.