Sunday, July 19, 2015

A Number of Choices, a Choice of Numbers

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Write down the following six numbers: 19, 28, 38, 81, 83, 85. What are the next three numbers in the series?
The answer doesn't immediately leap out at me. In the length of time it took me to write this post, though, Ross solved it.

You, however, worked it out immediately because you are that smart. We admire that about you. We also reward your smarts, in this case by supplying you with a special "Summertime" version of NPR's Contact Us form. May it proudly wave!

Summertime!!

Summertime

Summertime Blues....

Beautiful TampaBay June skies.

In the Summertime when the Weather is HOT....

Summertime Shoreline (GPDNP 3/14)

Summertime

summertime

Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor. As of this week, we are providing an alternative to the Red Cross. If the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.

Do you think we switched interns this week? Because last week's number was so specific (even if I heard it wrong) and this week, the number for the BARTENDER/BENDER puzzle was "over 2000." Luckily, no one picked above 1350, so I don't have to worry that we're missing a necessary level of specificity. Without giving anything away, I can guarantee that this week's puzzle will get fewer than 2000 entries. Pick a range by applying the rule that solves this week's puzzle or by shooting a dart at the chart, your choice.

Here are the ranges:
Zero and fewer
  1 - 50       
51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300
301 - 350
351 - 400
401 - 450
451 - 500

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050         
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
More than 5,000 and it sets a new record.
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600." We retain the discretion to award the prize to an entrant who picked the adjacent range (e.g., 601-650) if that entrant had not already won a prize. In the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of January, 2014, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do.

17 comments:

Word Woman said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Alex B. said...

"Without giving anything away, I can guarantee that this week's puzzle will get fewer than 2000 entries."

I don't know ... there's a very easy way to solve this puzzle.

Magdalen said...

Alex -- The issue isn't how easy it is to solve it, but how many people will even try. But feel free to disagree, and pick a range that is > 2000!

Curtis said...

I'll go with 351 - 400. This one isn't nearly as easy as last week, but it's not terribly hard, either.

Maggie Strasser said...

451-500 please.

Natasha said...

I select the 601-650 range, please.

David said...

1001 to 1050, again, please.

B Haven said...

301-350 range for this week, please.

Surprisingly many correct answers for last week, more than 2,000. Hey, tar bender, is bartender the first occupation starting with the letter "b" that people try. Maybe.

Unknown said...

I'm surprised by the high number last week. Must have been a lot of people listening last Sunday while at the bar. Anyway, my guess for this week is 251-300. --Margaret G.

Mendo Jim said...

Did Will give the impression that his friend Roldolfo made up this puzzle? It is not a new one.
But it is a clever one, requiring a not unexpected approach.
I guess that 2000 boozers will far surpass, say, 200 counters.

legolambda said...

551-600, please. Some puzzles are number puzzles posing as word puzzles. Other puzzles are word puzzles posing as number puzzles. We have an example of the former on Puzzleria! this week.

12-5-7-15Lambda

Joe Kupe said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Joe Kupe said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Joe Kupe said...

Tough one this week. We have an answer but will wait until tomorrow in case we get a better one for our official NPR entry. 151-200 please.

Word Woman said...

1401-1450 please.

Joe Kupe said...

We got it! And just entered it! Very hard this week!

Paul said...

Waiting for the other shoe to drop