Thursday, July 9, 2015

O'er the Armstrap We Watched...?

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
The seven words in the following sentence have something very unusual in common — something that almost no other words in the English language share. What is it?
"Ira saw three emigrants restock large wands."
We'd gone to a baseball game the night before (which happened to be the 4th of July) so we got to sing the Rats-Spangled Brenna while watching the lyrics on the Jumbotron. Maybe that's why we were able to take the anagrams of Will's Seven Words: AIR, WAS, THERE, STREAMING, ROCKETS, GLARE, and DAWN'S and immediately think: national anthem!

I think his claim that there are "almost no other words" is fair. In addition to ARMSTRAP for RAMPARTS, Will could have used BOARD for BROAD, and LAYER or RELAY for EARLY. After that, it gets a bit silly. (Uropsile for perilous? I don't think so.) And while ROE or ORE for O'ER is possible, I figure the elided words--the ones with an apostrophe where a letter should be--are best left unanagrammed.

You're going to have to trust me on this, but SPANGLED yields boring photos over at Flickr, and BANNER is even worse. Here's a sampling of STAR photos:

star in my bedroom

River of Stars

Dog Stars

Starring: A Cactus Macro

Stars

'Stars Over the Cuillins' - Glen Brittle, Isle of Skye, Scotland

The stars do not know that they are stars

Time for



Here are this week's picks:
Zero and fewer
    1 - 50
 51 - 100 -- Paul
101 - 150 -- Ross
151 - 200 -- B Haven
201 - 250 -- Word Woman
251 - 300 -- Jay
301 - 350 -- Legolambda
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450 -- Joe Kupe
451 - 500 -- Magdalen

501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650 -- Maggie Strasser
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800 -- Margaret G.
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry B.W.
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

5 comments:

Word Woman said...

If Will could leave out an apostrophe in dawn's, we could fairly add one to o'er, IMHO.

Wonder if "o'er" would bring up any interesting images. Or "dawn's" or "dawns."

David said...

I always think of a star-spangled banana. And I wonder which ram parts. And picture a lance being run through the knight.

Mendo Jim said...

There are several reasons I am proud to say I didn't solve this puzzle.


Accepted as non-robot with no test!

Paul said...

David,
Which ram parts?
I'd go with the fat portions.

legolambda said...

Sorry, Paul. The fat portions of the ram parts are all gone. Mar(y) Sprat, wife of Jack, gobbled them up. She could eat no lean but she could sure pack away the ram fat and blubbery pie! (See the Guilted Palace Of Sin Slice.)

LegoLeanOnMe,FatPortionsOnYou!