Thursday, July 23, 2015

Opening and Closing Numbers

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Write down the following six numbers: 19, 28, 38, 81, 83, 85. What are the next three numbers in the series?
The answer Ross got is easiest to see when the numbers are written out:
NINETEEN, TWENTY-EIGHT, THIRTY-EIGHT, EIGHTY-ONE, EIGHTY-THREE, EIGHTY-FIVE...
In each case, the starting letter (N, T, T, E, E, E) matches that number's final letter. The next three in the series are: EIGHTY-NINE, NINETY-SEVEN, ONE HUNDRED (and) TWO. Note that it doesn't matter how you write 102: One-oh-two, One Hundred Two, or One Hundred and Two, they all start with O and end with O.

I asked Flickr what it has for "one oh two" and I'm pleasantly surprised with the results:

Big Heart of Art - 1000 Visual Mashups

Girls family 2007

07-16-06 Creepy stairs

harpseal... Yet again.... and again.. the 2009,10,11,12 hunt starts soon

Tatooine sunrise?

First light on Eckhart Hall, University of Chicago, January 2010

Time for



Here are this week's picks:
Zero and fewer
    1 - 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200 -- Joe Kupe
201 - 250 -- Ross
251 - 300 -- Margaret G.
301 - 350 -- B. Haven
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450 -- Magdalen
451 - 500 -- Maggie Strasser

501 - 550
551 - 600 -- Legolambda
601 - 650 -- Natasha
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450 -- Word Woman
1,451 - 1,500

1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).

2 comments:

legolambda said...

Magdalen,
Great images! One oh two. Who knew?

LegohTwo

Unknown said...

Lego said I won - I won! Would it be too greedy if I asked for the puzzle books again? Those were fun to have, and so easily portable. --Margaret G.