Thursday, October 22, 2015

White Mice Rule!

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Challenge:
This is a creative challenge. The object is to write a 10-word sentence in which each word ends with the same letter of the alphabet.

For example: Dartmouth frosh clash with Pittsburgh church parish, clinch fifth triumph.

Every word in my sentence ends with H. You can choose any letter you like. Entries will be judged on sensibility, naturalness of syntax and overall elegance. The person who submits the best sentence in my opinion will play the puzzle on the air in two weeks.
As you know, we don't actually submit to NPR, so we didn't work really hard on this one. I do think it's an interesting challenge. I talked with Henry about it and agree with his assessment: do you go for the natural syntax, or do you attempt a higher degree of difficulty? E, S and N are pretty easy; H (above) is medium difficulty; all the really high point Scrabbly letters (Z, X, J, etc.) are virtually impossible.

Here's my "easy" effort, which I concede isn't nearly good enough, but what do I care?
Since white mice rule the universe, maybe people choose exile.
Please, please, please post your sentences in the comments! I want to see.

More October photos, as "sentence" got me nothing except a boring corporate meeting. Really.

underground symmetry II

Synchronicity

Paradise

Batsto, New Jersey.

cutting edge

No shadows

DSC_5697 - Port Bickerton Lighthouse

DSC_8931 - Were is MY duck?


Time for:
Here are this week's picks:
  0 - 25
26 - 50
51 - 75
76 - 100
101 - 125
126 - 150
151 - 175
176 - 200
201 - 225
226 - 250

251 - 275
276 - 300
301 - 325
326 - 350 - Ross
351 - 375 - Maggie Strasser
376 - 400
401 - 425
426 - 450 - Magdalen
451 - 475
476 - 500
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650 - Joe Kupe
651 - 700
701 - 750 - legolambda
751 - 800 - Margaret G.
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000 - David

1,001 - 1,050 - Paul
1,051 - 1,100 - Henry
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 - Curtis
1,401 - 1,450 - Jay
1,451 - 1,500
1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,500
2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize goes to the person who picked the range that includes that specific number.

4 comments:

David said...

My entry was "Can African-American, non-politician, brain surgeon Ben Carson win Republican nomination?", which I posted at Blaine's early on..

Curtis said...

I entered the following: The petite prince broke the throne, once he became obese.

legolambda said...

Describe one distinctive attribute those like the sentence here share.

I did not get the call. Duh! David or Curtis should have!

LegoThereWereScoresOfGreatEntriesToThisChallengeIncludingMendoJim'spatjberry'sEtc.Etc.Etc....

Jay said...

I went overboard with "David denied dreaded Druid dyad deed did defraud dead Donald."
Mary Ann went for more elegance (elegant lady that she is) with "That ancient stalwart aunt might wilt but wont faint."