Thursday, November 19, 2015

Defeat the Beat...Poet? Cop? Down?

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Think of a word that contains three consecutive letters of the alphabet together — like CANOPY, which contains NOP. Change these three letters to one new letter to make a synonym of the first word. What words are these?
I thought of D-E-F immediately (Ross had thought R-S-T might work), but he was the one to solve it for us: DEFEAT + B = BEAT

I can well believe there are alternatives. Be sure to include them in your comments. Will Shortz should announce which alternatives he accepted.

I looked at both "defeat" and "beat" as search terms. (There's a weird, and anatomically impossible, plastic doll in most of the "beat" photos. Don't want to know why.) Here are the best of both:

Heart Beat at Covent Garden 3

Beaten path

Honda Beat

Beating 11/12

A Competitor will find a way to win

Magnolia flowers

Shangri-Llama


Time for:

Here are this week's picks:
  0 - 25
26 - 50
51 - 75
76 - 100
101 - 125
126 - 150
151 - 175
176 - 200
201 - 225
226 - 250

251 - 275
276 - 300
301 - 325
326 - 350
351 - 375
376 - 400 - Maggie Strasser
401 - 425 - Magdalen
426 - 450
451 - 475
476 - 500
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650 - Paul
651 - 700 - legolambda
701 - 750 - Ross
751 - 800 - Margaret G.
801 - 850 - Joe Kupe
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000 - Marie

1,001 - 1,050 - David
1,051 - 1,100 - Henry BW
1,101 - 1,150 - B. Haven
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350 - Mendo Jim
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500
1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,500
2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize goes to the person who picked the range that includes that specific number.

7 comments:

Alex B. said...

There are not many alternatives. How do you feel about "indefinitely" and "infinitely"? Because that's the "best" alternative I could find.

David said...

If the puzzle was looking for antonyms, WORST and WON.

Joe Kupe said...

Alex, we entered defeat/beat and like you we also came up with indefinite/infinite.

legolambda said...

I just thought of this now, but BURST and BUD kinda work.
I did two "piggyback" puzzles of this NPR puzzle in today's PUzzleria! (See the "blogroll"in right margin for a link.)

LegoButActuallyToBudIsToBurstReallyReallySlowly

Word Woman said...

From a eulogy given yesterday for my dear friend:

"Dad was a proud curmudgeon. It’s easy to see a curmudgeon as a grumpy and ill-tempered codger. There is some truth to that, but it misses the point. A curmudgeon is someone who knows the dangers of false sentimentality and finds ways to challenge disingenuous words and deeds. It’s more of a cause than a condition or mood. Dad experienced those dangers more than once in his life."

I thought perhaps you might enjoy, Mendo Jim (as well as other curmudgeons and curmudgeon fans.)

Mendo Jim said...

R.I.P., Dad.

Word Woman said...

Thanks, Mendo Jim.