Sunday, November 1, 2015

Love Puzzle Number 9

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
The object is to arrange three 9s to make 20. There is no trick involved. Simply arrange three 9s, using any standard arithmetic signs and symbols, to total 20. How can it be done?
Ross and I have already had "words" about this one. I thought perhaps you could take the letters of three iterations of "nine" (lower or uppercase: NINE) and create a readable version of TWENTY (upper or lowercase). But no, Ross is right--it must be 9 9 9 = 20.

We don't have an answer for you...yet...but you most assuredly are smarter than we, so here's the NPR Contact Us form, already bundled up for the winter (which may mean only a jaunty scarf where you live; we don't know your lives).

(Ooh, and Ross solved it. He's brilliant.)

I, on the other hand, am merely pedestrian. But I do like a brilliant photo (and a brilliant husband). Here is the number 9:

9 Corazones "escandinavos"

9 windows 18 lights

9

Myrtle Station 16:9

9 Recycled Papers

9

Panorama 21:9 Wide

Time for
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor, either to the Red Cross, or, if the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.

Today's magic number is "over 1,100." No one won, simply because only one of you went that low. So much for the "super easy" puzzles generating a lot of entries...I guess? Anyway, this week is solvable, but it's math, which some people hate, as we know. So--pick a range!

Here are the ranges:
   0 - 25
 26 - 50
 51 - 75
 76 - 100
101 - 125
126 - 150
151 - 175
176 - 200
201 - 225
226 - 250

251 - 275
276 - 300
301 - 325
326 - 350
351 - 375
376 - 400
401 - 425
426 - 450
451 - 475
476 - 500
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500
1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,500
2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600.").  As of August, 2015, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do.

15 comments:

Maggie Strasser said...

351 - 375, please.

Embarrassed to admit I didn't solve last weeks puzzle as I was trying to think an an answer which fit EVERY holiday, and not the upcoming one; even with the answer grinning in my face all week.

B. Haven said...

501 - 550 this week, please. Nice photos you selected.

After I "sorta" solved it with a trick, I noticed that the puzzle said "There is no trick involved." I hadn't opened my computer then, so hadn't submitted the tricky solution, but I think others will submit answers that rely on a trick.

Natasha said...

I select 1001-1050 range, please.

Seth said...

Oh this one's good.

Unknown said...

I guess it depends on what you call a trick. I got the answer quickly (for me), and I would call this just basic math. I'm going with 451-475 (only because I think many of Will's listeners are happier with word puzzles than math puzzles). --Margaret G.

legolambda said...

551-600, please. Yes, Margaret G., I agree that Will's listeners are "wordies" more than they are "mathies."

Lego#9#9#9

Mendo Jim said...

I am usually pretty good at this type of puzzle, but I keep thinking Wee Willy didn't say "make an equation."

Curtis said...

I don't know why this one took me as long as it did to solve. I'm guessing most of the listeners are word puzzle types, and might give up a little too easily on this one. I'll go with 151 - 175.

David said...

476 - 500, please.

SarahE said...

901-950
Sarah

Wordnerd said...

WordNerd
301-325 Please! Must agree with everyone who said "Will's listeners are word puzzlers.
WN

Joe Kupe said...

76 - 100 please. I think Will does not consider it a trick because he used the following wording, "any standard signs and symbols."

Fred said...

401-425 please.
Fred

Jay said...

As an old math major(emphasis on old,)I tried some fancy stuff and then settled on something fairly simple. Oh well! How about 326-250.

B. Haven said...

Yes, the NPR puzzle listeners are mostly word people. Math puzzles are few and far between on Sunday mornings.

In 2014, on August 17, Will gave another number puzzle from Sam Loyd: You have a target with six rings, bearing the numbers 16, 17, 23, 24, 39, and 40. How can you score exactly 100 points, by shooting at the target.

That one had 1000 correct answers. This puzzle is as simple.