Sunday, November 8, 2015

Who Will Win?

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Name a famous actor — using both first and last name. Drop the first two letters of the first name and the last two letters of the last name. Then put a Y between what's left of the two names.

The result, reading from left to right, will identify who might solve this challenge and play puzzle on the air with me next week.
We solved it over breakfast, quick like a bunny-bunny because Ross has to hit the road for a guitar thing.

This needs be a HINTS-FREE comment section. I think you know why.

I know you've solved it, and so here's my hint for you: Send in your answer using the hints-free NPR Contact Us Form, hyper-linked right here.

I asked Flickr about "hint" and here's what I found. (Warning: a lot of photos, simply because there were so many to pick from--and because I have the "good" Internets again!)

Fall Color

Sunrise

Doppler Effect

on a grey winter day

Bricks

Caerphilly castle

Rhonda, Spain

A hint of autumn

Layers of what

Time for
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor, either to the Red Cross, or, if the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.

Today's magic number is "over 600." No one won, although Legolambda came close. So much for the math puzzles not generating a lot of entries. This week, we're back to picking a famous actor, which is easy? Not easy? Not math, at least. Go ahead, I dare you: pick a range!

Here are the ranges:
   0 - 25
 26 - 50
 51 - 75
 76 - 100
101 - 125
126 - 150
151 - 175
176 - 200
201 - 225
226 - 250

251 - 275
276 - 300
301 - 325
326 - 350
351 - 375
376 - 400
401 - 425
426 - 450
451 - 475
476 - 500
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500
1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,500
2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600.").  As of August, 2015, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do.

12 comments:

Word Woman said...

1201-1250, please.

Happy November!

Natasha said...

I select 601-650 range please. Not too difficult today.

Curtis said...

This one is really easy, especially when approached backwards. I figured out the second part of the answer first, and used that to ascertain the actor's name. I'll try 1,351 - 1,400.

legolambda said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
legolambda said...

Yes, Magdalen, close but no perfecto for me last week. This week I shall choose 501-550 please. I believe that this is another solid puzzle from Will Shortz. But I also believe it to be a tad more difficult than does our esteemed range-picker, Natasha.

Finally, I believe that Curtis is a savvy puzzle solver.

LegoWhoInvitesCurtis,NatashaAndAllPuzzleLoversToVisitMeOnPuzzleria!

Maggie Strasser said...

801-850 please

Natasha said...

Thanks lego!! Now I feel like royalty.

B. Haven said...

1,001 - 1,050 for this week, please.

Possibly the number of correct answers submitted is determined not only by how hard or easy the puzzle is, but how much people do or do not want to play the puzzle on the air.

Mendo Jim said...

Except to give Will Shortz an alternative answer to ignore, I haven't sent one in in over ten years.
It is easier not to submit material now that the process is unavailable to my dial-up internet system.
Not sad though, my chances of being selected are just a tiny bit less than one who submits an answer.

I think 1500 + is possible, but unlikely.

David said...

951 to 1000, please.

Unknown said...

This took me WAY longer than perhaps it should have. I'll go with 476-500. --Margaret G.

Joe Kupe said...

551 - 600 please. I think the puzzles skews older this week!