Sunday, August 30, 2015

Paging Satchel...

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Name a famous movie in eight letters that has had multiple sequels. The title is one word. Rearrange its letters to get a two-word phrase for a satchel. What is it?
Ross has solved it and told me the answer. He has a mild objection. You may have stronger objections, which you're all welcome to discuss in the comment thread to the Thursday post. For today, it's no-hint Sunday.

Of course you don't need no stinkin' hints, as you've already solved it. So you sit quietly, tapping your foot, waiting for me to give you this: the hyperlink to the NPR Contact Us Form. Go ahead--submit your answer, I know you want to. We'll be here when you get back.

I asked Flickr for "satchel" and got a lot of photos of handbags (and some of a band--I swear every search term I use in Flickr has been used for a band's name, and every one of those bands has been photographed a zillion times!). But thanks to a lovely dog, I eked out six photos:

shark eye!

cause this is nothing like we ever dreamt

SchoolbagRivet

Child with school bag, Atlas Morocco

Supermarket

satchel sunshine

Time for



This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor. As of this week, we are providing an alternative to the Red Cross. If the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.

So smart of Word Woman and Legolambda to pick one of the roundest numbers: 2,000. WW had the numbers leading up to and including 2,000; LL had 2,001 and up. Legolambda wins, as we heard Rachel announce it as "over 2,000." What we cannot know is whether the Unpaid Intern (who, I suspect, is new at the job--I think they switch over in August) eyeballed it and said, "Eh, call it 'over 2,000'" when it's really...just a large number. Doesn't matter! We have rules! And under those rules, LL wins (again). So, tell us what prize you want this time...

This week's puzzle seems similarly easy. What range do you want this time?

Here are the NEW ranges:
   0 - 25
 26 - 50
 51 - 75
 76 - 100
101 - 125
126 - 150
151 - 175
176 - 200
201 - 225
226 - 250

251 - 275
276 - 300
301 - 325
326 - 350
351 - 375
376 - 400
401 - 425
426 - 450
451 - 475
476 - 500
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500
1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,500
2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600.").  As of August, 2015, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do.

Thursday, August 27, 2015

No SNAFU Here

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Name a famous military figure of the past 50 years. The first three letters of his first name and the first three letters of his last name are both well-known military abbreviations. Who is it?
I didn't solve this one because Ross got it almost immediately. And he got it because he's been watching "America: The Story of Us" on Netflix, and the answer, General COLin POWell, is a commentator on that series.

I was curious to see what "SNAFU" would get me over on Flickr:

Snafu

SNAFU

Snafu

confusion

P47 Thunderbolt - Flying Legends 2012

rainSaturday  |  dc  |  51688.jpg

Time for


Here are this week's picks:
  0 - 25
26 - 50
51 - 75
76 - 100
101 - 125
126 - 150
151 - 175
176 - 200
201 - 225
226 - 250

251 - 275
276 - 300
301 - 325 - Natasha
326 - 350
351 - 375
376 - 400
401 - 425
426 - 450
451 - 475
476 - 500
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800 - Ross
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050 - David
1,051 - 1,100 - Henry BW
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250 - Margaret G.
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 - Curtis
1,401 - 1,450 - B. Haven
1,451 - 1,500
1,501 - 1,550 - Paul
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850 - Magdalen
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000 - Word Woman

2,001 - 2,250 - legolambda
2,251 - 2,500 - Mendo Jim
2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize goes to the person who picked the range that includes that specific number.

Sunday, August 23, 2015

Short & Sweet, High & Tight

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Name a famous military figure of the past 50 years. The first three letters of his first name and the first three letters of his last name are both well-known military abbreviations. Who is it?
I'll wait for the curmudgeons to say if this one is FUBAR.

Of course, your powers of abbreviations are AOK, so you solved it ASAP and merely need the NPRCUF (presented here in its unabbreviated form) to submit your answer.

Lots of photos today. Although it's actually quite cool here right now, this time of the year makes me think of the "dog days of summer." So that's what I typed in to Flickr:

Mother and her Children

Dog Days of Summer

365-217, Weekly Theme: Water

Dog Days at Taos Pueblo

Beach Fun

Dog Dayz of Summer

Looking Back

DSCN2606

Misty day on Melkbos

REMEMBER: THE PICK-A-RANGE CHART HAS CHANGED! (Read last Thursday's post for an explanation.) Be sure to look over your choices carefully before picking.

Time for


This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor. As of this week, we are providing an alternative to the Red Cross. If the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.

Sure enough, after rattling off all the different answers Will accepted, the number out of Rachel's mouth was a round "100." No one picked that low, and we know this week will be MUCH HIGHER. No worries--those lower ranges in the NEW range chart will come into play again soon.

Here are the NEW ranges:
   0 - 25
 26 - 50
 51 - 75
 76 - 100
101 - 125
126 - 150
151 - 175
176 - 200
201 - 225
226 - 250

251 - 275
276 - 300
301 - 325
326 - 350
351 - 375
376 - 400
401 - 425
426 - 450
451 - 475
476 - 500
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500
1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,500
2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600.").  As of August, 2015, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do.

Thursday, August 20, 2015

We've Got Ten! Do I Hear Eleven? Going...Going...

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
This is an open-ended challenge. Take the word EASILY. You can rearrange its letters to spell SAY and LEI. These two words rhyme even though they have no letters in common.

What is the longest familiar word you can find that can be anagrammed into two shorter words that rhyme but have no letters in common? The two shorter words must have only one syllable. I have my best answer, which I've given to NPR. Next week we'll compare that to your best.
Ross wrote a Perl program using a rhyming dictionary as a database. Henry (our Fresh Air Fund kid for a few days while it was ten degrees cooler here than in Philadelphia) just thought about it. He came up with SHINGLY = NIGH + SLY.

Ross's computer did a bit better: three 9-letter words, and one ten:
PHYSICKED = PSYCH + DIKE
PEACHICKS = CHIC + SPEAK
POWERCUTS = COUP + STREW
LIGHTYEARS = SLEIGH + TRAY
Given that a brainiac thinking for a few hours came up with a seven-letter word while a computer was needed to come up with a few nines and one ten-letter word, I think it's safe to say this was a toughie. I'll be interested to hear what wins and what Will Shortz had in mind AND whether anyone got anything longer than ten letters. (And yes, power-cuts is, at the least, hyphenated. But c'mon, it was worth reporting...)

Buzz Lightyear is boring; peachicks are boring; what do we get with power cuts?

sunlight cutting through

(25/52) Flower Power

56080

Clue 4: Leo Szilard conceived 'Neutron Chain Reactions' whilst waiting for the lights to change on this street. The resident hairdressers are still in the dark.

Blackout

Mamallapuram, Arjuna's Penance


Time for

Here are this week's picks:
  0 - 25
26 - 50
51 - 75
76 - 100
101 - 125
126 - 150
151 - 175
176 - 200
201 - 225
226 - 250 - Margaret G.

251 - 275 - B. Haven
276 - 300
301 - 325
326 - 350
351 - 375 - Curtis
376 - 400
401 - 425
426 - 450
451 - 475
476 - 500
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700 - Word Woman
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050 - David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150 - legolambda
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500
1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,500
2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize goes to the person who picked the range that includes that specific number.

Sunday, August 16, 2015

Lei It on Us!

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
This is an open-ended challenge. Take the word EASILY. You can rearrange its letters to spell SAY and LEI. These two words rhyme even though they have no letters in common.

What is the longest familiar word you can find that can be anagrammed into two shorter words that rhyme but have no letters in common? The two shorter words must have only one syllable. I have my best answer, which I've given to NPR. Next week we'll compare that to your best.
By open-ended, I believe Will Shortz does not mean you get to take all the time you want, but rather there is no one certain answer. But your interpretation may differ.

One thing I do know is that you haven't "solved" this one yet. But you will. And when you do, may I suggest you try this insouciant little NPR Contact Us Form as the perfect accompaniment for your answer?

I bet we get some really pretty photos if I ask Flickr for its leis.

View of Maui from the lanai at Hale Lei Lani on Molokai

lei'd and coconut ice cream : hana highway, maui, hawi'i

Mickey heart leis

Wanneer de lage lucht er grijs als leisteen is

rock climbing @ lei pi shan, yangshuo china

Lei Yue Muen, 1 Jul 2010

leis

REMEMBER: THE PICK-A-RANGE CHART HAS CHANGED! (Read Thursday's post for an explanation.) Be sure to look over your choices carefully before picking.

Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor. As of this week, we are providing an alternative to the Red Cross. If the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.

Over 1,300 entries last week for the Seattle Seat Belt. No one won, which is good for me because I still need to package up Legolambda's amazing present from the week before. (It's going today, I promise, LL!) And now we have a "creative" challenge of sorts. These tend not to be heavily subscribed, but I could be wrong about that. Oh, well, at least we'll have fun working out our NEW pick with the NEW range chart!

Here are the NEW ranges:
   0 - 25
 26 - 50
 51 - 75
 76 - 100
101 - 125
126 - 150
151 - 175
176 - 200
201 - 225
226 - 250

251 - 275
276 - 300
301 - 325
326 - 350
351 - 375
376 - 400
401 - 425
426 - 450
451 - 475
476 - 500
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500
1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,500
2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600.").  As of August, 2015, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do.

Thursday, August 13, 2015

A City I've Been to!

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Name part of a car. Drop the fifth letter. Now reverse the order of the last three letters. The result, reading from left to right, will name a major American city. What city is it?
Like Curtis, I solved this with good ol' Wiki's list of American cities. Flip the last three letters...and you get gibberish. Until you don't. SEAT BELT > SEAT ELT > SEATTLE

Before I get to the photos du jour, I want to preview the upcoming ALL NEW Pick a Range chart. This is my answer to the fact that we're all pretty smart at guessing which will be the really low-entry puzzles, and the fact that there simply aren't enough ranges between zero and, say, 500. Well, with this new array, there will be twice as many.

Here are the ALL NEW & IMPROVED ranges:
  0 - 25
26 - 50
51 - 75
76 - 100
101 - 125
126 - 150
151 - 175
176 - 200
201 - 225
226 - 250

251 - 275
276 - 300
301 - 325
326 - 350
351 - 375
376 - 400
401 - 425
426 - 450
451 - 475
476 - 500
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500
1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,500
2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600.").  As of August, 2015, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do.

So far, the low entry-generating puzzles have had pretty specific numbers announced--270, 165, that kind of thing. As long as that continues, we're good. As the fine print explains, the range that contains the number announced is the winner. With the words "more than," it's the range starting with X+1, so that "more than 300" is 301-325. Same for "fewer than" in that the winning range will be the one including numbers leading up to the round number. I'll leave you to mull over your New & Improved picking strategy. Remember: throwing a dart is still a good one!

But here's the thing. I will announce this again on Sunday, when you'll be expected to use the new ranges. Picking 251-300, for example, will be a null pick. So don't lose your chance to get a fabulous prize!!

On to pictures of Seattle.

Seattle

Daleks Invade Seattle

Seattle Graffiti

Sail On

Seattle Public Library IMG_2865

Seattle from Harbor Ave

All That Love All Those Mistakes

color blocked

Time for



Here are this week's picks:
Zero and fewer
   1 - 50
 51 - 100
101 - 150
151 - 200
201 - 250
251 - 300 -- Ross
301 - 350 -- Margaret G.
351 - 400 -- Curtis
401 - 450 -- Legolambda
451 - 500 -- Magdalen

501 - 550 -- Natasha
551 - 600
601 - 650 -- Joe Kupe
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000
1,001 - 1,050 -- David
1,051 - 1,100 -- Henry BW
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500 -- Paul

1,501 - 1,550 -- Word Woman
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650 -- B. Haven
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000
2,001 - 2,050
2,051 - 2,100
2,101 - 2,150
2,151 - 2,200
2,201 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,300
2,301 - 2,350
2,351 - 2,400
2,401 - 2,450
2,451 - 2,500

2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,250
3,251 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

 > 5,000
 > 5,000 + new record
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), AND two separate people picked the ranges of numbers just before and just after that round number, the prize will be awarded to whichever entrant had not already won a prize, or in the event that both entrants had won a prize already or neither had, then to the earlier of the two entries on the famous judicial principle of "First Come First Serve," (or in technical legal jargon, "You Snooze, You Lose").  As of July 2012, this rule is officially no longer obsolete (and also I still just like having fine print).