Sunday, September 27, 2015

Uno Puzzlé Italiano

Here is this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Name a famous Greek person from history. Rearrange the letters of the name to get the title of a famous Italian person from history. Who are these two people?
Ross can anagram in his head. I needed help. That's all I'm saying about that.

You need no help, well, other than this NPR Contact Us form linked to here, and even that you could get for yourself. I'm just saving you a tiny bit of effort.

Not surprisingly, asking Flickr for "thinking cap" (in honor of today's on-air puzzle) led to a lot of knitted hats. But asking just for "thinking" led to this:

a place to think

she's all that i think of

Thinking..(againg)

The Thinking Kangaroo |  Great Ocean Road

Gray Whale Cove Beach Rocks as the golden sun thinks about setting over our globe, Northern California Coast, USA

Think of.....YoU


Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor. As of this week, we are providing an alternative to the Red Cross. If the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.

Today's magic number is 340. I picked the slot below that one, and Curtis picked the slot above, but no one won. Which just goes to show that your picks are as good as mine!

Here are the NEW ranges:
   0 - 25
 26 - 50
 51 - 75
 76 - 100
101 - 125
126 - 150
151 - 175
176 - 200
201 - 225
226 - 250

251 - 275
276 - 300
301 - 325
326 - 350
351 - 375
376 - 400
401 - 425
426 - 450
451 - 475
476 - 500
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500
1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,500
2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600.").  As of August, 2015, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do.

Thursday, September 24, 2015

A Reel Waist of Thyme

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Take the words FORETOLD and FOURFOLD. They start with homophones, FORE and FOUR, and they end with rhymes, TOLD and FOLD. The challenge is to find two common nine-letter compound words that have the same property. Specifically, the two homophones are each five letters long, and the rhymes have four letters each. What words are these?
We believe the intended answer to be WAISTBAND and WASTELAND. Did anyone get anything else?

Was there some disagreement about homographs and homophones? Here's a Venn diagram to help:

I have no idea if that's accurate. What can I say? I got it off the Internet! (Here, to be precise.)

More September photos!

Sunset

The Blue Mountains Westin Hotel - HDR

Kirkjufell

DSC_9828 - All alone am I...

Parrot

Trostansfjörður

Time for:
Here are this week's picks:
  0 - 25
26 - 50 - Margaret G.
51 - 75
76 - 100
101 - 125 - Paul
126 - 150 - Word Woman
151 - 175
176 - 200 - Maggie Strasser
201 - 225 - Joe Kupe
226 - 250 - Ross

251 - 275
276 - 300
301 - 325 - Magdalen
326 - 350
351 - 375 - Curtis
376 - 400
401 - 425 - Jay
426 - 450
451 - 475
476 - 500
501 - 550 - legolambda
551 - 600 - B. Haven
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800 - Fred
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050 - David
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500
1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,500
2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize goes to the person who picked the range that includes that specific number.

Sunday, September 20, 2015

He Mustered Some Ketchup

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Take the words FORETOLD and FOURFOLD. They start with homophones, FORE and FOUR, and they end with rhymes, TOLD and FOLD. The challenge is to find two common nine-letter compound words that have the same property. Specifically, the two homophones are each five letters long, and the rhymes have four letters each. What words are these?
How hard can it be? (Code language for "I'll let Ross solve it.")

Hah! You need no help solving it, clearly. You're all ready to submit your answer, so let's just get to the good stuff, where "good stuff" is this handy link to the NPR Contact Us Form.

Yup, Ross has an answer. We suspect there's more than one.

Okay, I asked Flickr for homophones--not a large selection, but I picked a few out for you:

The Petters

Bark Bark

Male Delivery Here Please

Eye Wood Knot

Cool Carp

Can't get over this sky

Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor. As of this week, we are providing an alternative to the Red Cross. If the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.

I heard 317 and Ross (who'd picked unconscionably large last week) heard 317,000. Let's just say no one won. I'm guessing this week is easier than last week, but ALL of us over-shot the range last week. So...your pick is as good as mine!
Here are the NEW ranges:
   0 - 25
 26 - 50
 51 - 75
 76 - 100
101 - 125
126 - 150
151 - 175
176 - 200
201 - 225
226 - 250

251 - 275
276 - 300
301 - 325
326 - 350
351 - 375
376 - 400
401 - 425
426 - 450
451 - 475
476 - 500
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500
1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,500
2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600.").  As of August, 2015, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do.

Thursday, September 17, 2015

Puzzle Master Goes Up, Comes Down, Goes Up...

Here is this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
It's a well-known curiosity that the longest common unhyphenated word that can be typed on the top row of a typewriter or computer keyboard is TYPEWRITER.

Find a common hyphenated word in 12 letters that can be typed using only the keys on the top row of a typewriter or computer keyboard.
I don't believe Ross needed Google to solve this--the intended answer, we believe, is TEETER-TOTTER. He certainly got it fast enough.

I won't bore you with pictures of seesaws (aka teeter-totters). In my childhood neighborhood park, the seesaws were next to the merry-go-round (similarly boring). I do like carousels, though:

Carousel

Colourful carousel

Seaport Village Carousel Horse  - San Diego

The Dragon on the Carousel at London's Southbank

Carousel Horse at Coney Island October 2011

King Triton's Carousel of the Sea


Time for:


Here are this week's picks:

  0 - 25
26 - 50
51 - 75
76 - 100
101 - 125
126 - 150
151 - 175
176 - 200
201 - 225
226 - 250

251 - 275
276 - 300
301 - 325
326 - 350
351 - 375
376 - 400 - Maggie Strasser
401 - 425
426 - 450
451 - 475
476 - 500
501 - 550 - Joe Kupe
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900 - legolambda
901 - 950 - Paul
951 - 1,000 - Natasha

1,001 - 1,050 - David
1,051 - 1,100 - Henry BW
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250 - Magdalen
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350 - B. Haven
1,351 - 1,400 - Curtis
1,401 - 1,450 - Marie
1,451 - 1,500
1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000 - Word Woman

2,001 - 2,250 - Margaret G.
2,251 - 2,500
2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000 - Ross
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize goes to the person who picked the range that includes that specific number.

Sunday, September 13, 2015

Top Line O'Type

Here is this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
It's a well-known curiosity that the longest common unhyphenated word that can be typed on the top row of a typewriter or computer keyboard is TYPEWRITER.

Find a common hyphenated word in 12 letters that can be typed using only the keys on the top row of a typewriter or computer keyboard.
Ross got this immediately. (I was still fuming over "common usage.")

As fast as Ross was, you're even faster. Which is why I apologize for delaying your entry by not loading this special, all-QWERTY, \PR {O\T|{|{T U] }OR\ (NPR Contact Us Form) sooner.

Time for more September photos. Where we live at least, today is going to be classic fall weather: cool, damp, with a chance of showers. Tomorrow--and all of next week, in fact--we're back to summer. Gotta love September!

Beside the Still Waters

Orloj

Kingdom of the Eagle

Twilight field (widescreen)

'Bioluminescent Waves & Aurora' - Anglesey

Barca varada (Explorer)

Through the fields

Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor. As of this week, we are providing an alternative to the Red Cross. If the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.

The magic number this week was 930, and no one won. I'm guessing this week is easier than last week, but most of us over-shot the range last week. So...your pick is as good as mine!

Here are the NEW ranges:
   0 - 25
 26 - 50
 51 - 75
 76 - 100
101 - 125
126 - 150
151 - 175
176 - 200
201 - 225
226 - 250

251 - 275
276 - 300
301 - 325
326 - 350
351 - 375
376 - 400
401 - 425
426 - 450
451 - 475
476 - 500
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500
1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,500
2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600.").  As of August, 2015, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do.

Thursday, September 10, 2015

What's that Big Mountain Called, Really?

Here is this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Name a well-known U.S. geographical place — two words; five letters in the first word, six letters in the last — that contains all five vowels (A, E, I, O and U) exactly once. It's a place that's been in the news. What is it?
I've looked and the news coverage, and as as far as I can tell, the mountain formerly known as "Mount McKinley" is now known as "Denali." Not, as this puzzle would suggest, MOUNT DENALI. If someone has evidence to the contrary, I'd love to see it.

I figured the puzzle out because Wiki has an entry for "Mount Rainer" which is a misspelling for Mount Rainier. I asked Ross to find all the incidences of place names in the US that satisfy the terms of this puzzle. Here they are (five also have a single Y):

Aiken County [in South Carolina]
Amite County [in Mississippi]
Davie County [in North Carolina]
House Island [in several states]
Mount Bailey [in several states]
Mount Bassie [in Alaska]
Mount Daniel [in Washington]
Mount Gilead [in several states]
Mount Hygeia [in Rhode Island]
Mount Mageik [in Alaska]
Mount McAdie [in California]
Mount Raimer [straddling Massachusetts and New York]
Mouse Island [in Ohio]
Outer Island [in several states]
Sousa Bridge [in D.C.]
South Vienna [in Ohio]
Union Chapel [in several states]
Union Tavern [in North Carolina]
Union Valley [in several states]


No matter how many words in its new official name, it's a gorgeous sight:

Denali lifts her skirts

Road to special places

Upper Muldrow Glacier

Denali  & Wonder Lake

Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos ssp.)

The High One II

Time for


Here are this week's picks:
  0 - 25 - Mendo Jim
26 - 50
51 - 75
76 - 100
101 - 125
126 - 150
151 - 175
176 - 200
201 - 225
226 - 250

251 - 275
276 - 300
301 - 325
326 - 350
351 - 375
376 - 400
401 - 425
426 - 450
451 - 475 - Ross
476 - 500
501 - 550 - Joe Kupe
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850 - Magdalen
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050 - David
1,051 - 1,100 - Henry BW
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200 - Natasha
1,201 - 1,250 - legolambda
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350 - Curtis
1,351 - 1,400 - Maggie Strasser
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500
1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000 - Word Woman

2,001 - 2,250 - Paul
2,251 - 2,500 - Margaret G.
2,501 - 2,750 - Marie
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize goes to the person who picked the range that includes that specific number.