Thursday, October 29, 2015

Halloween Pumpkin Poi, Anyone?

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
The Hawaiian alphabet has 12 letters — seven consonants (H, K, L, M, N, P and W) plus the five vowels (A, E, I, O and U). Use all 12 of these, and repeat four of them, to get 16 letters in all that can be arranged to name a well-known holiday item. What is it? As a hint — it's a two-word answer.
This must have been a clever realization, that you need all the letters of the Hawaiian alphabet to spell HALLOWEEN PUMPKIN, but does that make it a clever puzzle? And is it smart to run said puzzle the Sunday before Halloween, when even the red lights on the backs of water trucks look like lit-up carved pumpkins? (Or maybe I was imagining that phenomenon...)

Let's see what awesome cool Halloween pumpkins I can find on Flickr.

Pumpkin Contest 2011d

Jack and the Mrs.

Pumpkins

Will & Ellie's Totoro carved Halloween pumpkin

Happy Halloween

Pumpkins

pumpkins

Pumpkins

Time for:
Here are this week's picks:
  0 - 25
26 - 50
51 - 75
76 - 100
101 - 125
126 - 150
151 - 175
176 - 200
201 - 225
226 - 250

251 - 275
276 - 300
301 - 325
326 - 350
351 - 375
376 - 400
401 - 425 - Ross
426 - 450
451 - 475
476 - 500
501 - 550 - Natasha
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250 - Magdalen
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 - Curtis
1,401 - 1,450 - Maggie Strasser
1,451 - 1,500
1,501 - 1,550 - Word Woman
1,551 - 1,600 - legolambda
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000 - Joe Kupe

2,001 - 2,250 - B. Haven
2,251 - 2,500
2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,500 - Margaret G.
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize goes to the person who picked the range that includes that specific number.

Sunday, October 25, 2015

Holiday Item: Paparazzi Photo of a Date on Valentine's Day?

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
The Hawaiian alphabet has 12 letters — seven consonants (H, K, L, M, N, P and W) plus the five vowels (A, E, I, O and U). Use all 12 of these, and repeat four of them, to get 16 letters in all that can be arranged to name a well-known holiday item. What is it? As a hint — it's a two-word answer.
This is so easy...well, let's just say I got it as I grabbed the puzzle off the website. It's so easy, I don't care if people hint. Just make it funny, please. (Translation for those of our readers who come from the United Kingdom: "holiday" here does not mean "vacation.")

We've rejected (for many obvious reasons) Ross's pun, pecan poi.

Your offering is perfect in every respect, so congratulations! Submit it right now using this perfectly plain NPR Contact Us form, ready for any holiday decorations you might want to use.

I asked Flickr for  "holiday item" and here's what I got.

Eau - Water

Mexico-6074 - Observatory!!!!!

Stockton Beach

Tibet-5453

Holiday fire safety - Candles and fireplace

SUMMER BACHES


Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor. As of this week, we are providing an alternative to the Red Cross. If the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.

Today's magic number is 1,500. That wasn't mentioned on air, but it was on the website. Yay, NPR. We'd love it if the magic number is always listed on the website. (Well, it can't hurt to ask.) No one won, simply because no one went that high. And this week looks super easy. So pick an appropriately generous range!

Here are the NEW ranges:

   0 - 25
 26 - 50
 51 - 75
 76 - 100
101 - 125
126 - 150
151 - 175
176 - 200
201 - 225
226 - 250

251 - 275
276 - 300
301 - 325
326 - 350
351 - 375
376 - 400
401 - 425
426 - 450
451 - 475
476 - 500
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500
1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,500
2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600.").  As of August, 2015, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do.

Thursday, October 22, 2015

White Mice Rule!

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Challenge:
This is a creative challenge. The object is to write a 10-word sentence in which each word ends with the same letter of the alphabet.

For example: Dartmouth frosh clash with Pittsburgh church parish, clinch fifth triumph.

Every word in my sentence ends with H. You can choose any letter you like. Entries will be judged on sensibility, naturalness of syntax and overall elegance. The person who submits the best sentence in my opinion will play the puzzle on the air in two weeks.
As you know, we don't actually submit to NPR, so we didn't work really hard on this one. I do think it's an interesting challenge. I talked with Henry about it and agree with his assessment: do you go for the natural syntax, or do you attempt a higher degree of difficulty? E, S and N are pretty easy; H (above) is medium difficulty; all the really high point Scrabbly letters (Z, X, J, etc.) are virtually impossible.

Here's my "easy" effort, which I concede isn't nearly good enough, but what do I care?
Since white mice rule the universe, maybe people choose exile.
Please, please, please post your sentences in the comments! I want to see.

More October photos, as "sentence" got me nothing except a boring corporate meeting. Really.

underground symmetry II

Synchronicity

Paradise

Batsto, New Jersey.

cutting edge

No shadows

DSC_5697 - Port Bickerton Lighthouse

DSC_8931 - Were is MY duck?


Time for:
Here are this week's picks:
  0 - 25
26 - 50
51 - 75
76 - 100
101 - 125
126 - 150
151 - 175
176 - 200
201 - 225
226 - 250

251 - 275
276 - 300
301 - 325
326 - 350 - Ross
351 - 375 - Maggie Strasser
376 - 400
401 - 425
426 - 450 - Magdalen
451 - 475
476 - 500
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650 - Joe Kupe
651 - 700
701 - 750 - legolambda
751 - 800 - Margaret G.
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000 - David

1,001 - 1,050 - Paul
1,051 - 1,100 - Henry
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400 - Curtis
1,401 - 1,450 - Jay
1,451 - 1,500
1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,500
2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize goes to the person who picked the range that includes that specific number.

Sunday, October 11, 2015

Oooh, a Two-Week Creative Challenge!

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Challenge:
This is a creative challenge. The object is to write a 10-word sentence in which each word ends with the same letter of the alphabet.

For example: Dartmouth frosh clash with Pittsburgh church parish, clinch fifth triumph.

Every word in my sentence ends with H. You can choose any letter you like. Entries will be judged on sensibility, naturalness of syntax and overall elegance. The person who submits the best sentence in my opinion will play the puzzle on the air in two weeks.
There is no solve, there is only try.

But when you've been creative, here's where you want to wing the puzzle off to its intended target, the NPR Contact Us form. And don't forget, your deadline is Thursday, October 22, which is also the next time we'll blog. Enjoy your week off from us!!

Let's see what Flick has for "creative challenge"

Reflecting on the change of seasons - NJ

Because I Like Boats

Epi Dreams

nicolai eigtved, architect: christianskirken, christianshavn 1754-1759

* Moonlit Bench *

“日落天開雲中現” / 寧 Serenity / SML.20130416.6D.00779.P1.L1

Post Box

Time for
This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor. As of this week, we are providing an alternative to the Red Cross. If the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.

Today's magic number is 196. Joe Kupe won! Risk talk, pick quick, off-peak mid-week click, tsk tsk tsk.

Here are the NEW ranges:
   0 - 25
 26 - 50
 51 - 75
 76 - 100
101 - 125
126 - 150
151 - 175
176 - 200
201 - 225
226 - 250

251 - 275
276 - 300
301 - 325
326 - 350
351 - 375
376 - 400
401 - 425
426 - 450
451 - 475
476 - 500
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500
1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,500
2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600.").  As of August, 2015, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do.

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

Blues is My Favorite Color

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Think of a two-word term for someone who might be working at a nightclub. The second letter of the first word is a consonant. Move that letter so it's the second letter of the second word, and phonetically you'll get a made-up, two-word term for someone else who might work at a nightclub. What persons are these?
We really struggled with this one, possibly because we're idiots. Thankfully, Henry came to the rescue. His answer--and therefore, our answer--is BLUES SINGER becomes (phonetically) BOOZE SLINGER.

As you can imagine, the word "blues" lit up Flickr like a bottle of Skyy Vodka!

Blue ice

Blue afternoon

Blue cornflower, side view

Blue

Blue light

white lines on blue

Blue Morpho

Time for:

Here are this week's picks:
  0 - 25
26 - 50
51 - 75
76 - 100
101 - 125
126 - 150
151 - 175 - Ross
176 - 200 - Joe Kupe
201 - 225 - B. Haven
226 - 250 - Jay

251 - 275 - legolambda
276 - 300 - Magdalen
301 - 325 - Margaret G.
326 - 350 - Maggie Strasser
351 - 375 - Curtis
376 - 400
401 - 425
426 - 450
451 - 475
476 - 500
501 - 550 - David
551 - 600 - Marie
601 - 650
651 - 700 - Paul
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100 - Henry
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500
1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,500
2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize goes to the person who picked the range that includes that specific number.

Sunday, October 4, 2015

Nightclubs R Us?

Here's this week's NPR Sunday Puzzle:
Think of a two-word term for someone who might be working at a nightclub. The second letter of the first word is a consonant. Move that letter so it's the second letter of the second word, and phonetically you'll get a made-up, two-word term for someone else who might work at a nightclub. What persons are these?
Hmm. We don't much go to nightclubs. So all I can report is that we're "working on it."

You must go to nightclubs every night of the week, because you've solved it already. All you're waiting for is great music and this NPR Contact Us Form, dressed to the nines.

Here's what Flickr had to offer for "night club," once I rejected all the photos with people in them. (There was an awesome photo for "nightclub," but it wasn't Creative Commons. You can see it here.)

Paris, les quais de Seine

Until the dark

Italy - Milan Night Life

Follow Me to Crescent Lake (Explored)

On The Road To Success

Night Club, Bratislava

Serenity's Pathway (Explored)

Italy - Milan Canal Sunset

Time for

This is where we ask you how many entries you think NPR will get for the challenge above. If you want to win, leave a comment with your guess for the range of entries NPR will receive. First come first served, so read existing comments before you guess. Ross and I guess last, just before we publish the Thursday post. After the Thursday post is up, the entries are closed.

The winner gets a choice: they can receive a puzzle book of our choosing or they can ask that a charitable contribution is made in the winner's honor. As of this week, we are providing an alternative to the Red Cross. If the winner wishes, we will make a contribution to his/her NPR station. Send us the call letters and we'll do the rest.

Today's magic number is 629. Maggie Strasser is our winner this week! And now we all get to pick anew, even if we don't (yet) know the answer.

Here are the NEW ranges:
   0 - 25
 26 - 50
 51 - 75
 76 - 100
101 - 125
126 - 150
151 - 175
176 - 200
201 - 225
226 - 250

251 - 275
276 - 300
301 - 325
326 - 350
351 - 375
376 - 400
401 - 425
426 - 450
451 - 475
476 - 500
501 - 550
551 - 600
601 - 650
651 - 700
701 - 750
751 - 800
801 - 850
851 - 900
901 - 950
951 - 1,000

1,001 - 1,050
1,051 - 1,100
1,101 - 1,150
1,151 - 1,200
1,201 - 1,250
1,251 - 1,300
1,301 - 1,350
1,351 - 1,400
1,401 - 1,450
1,451 - 1,500
1,501 - 1,550
1,551 - 1,600
1,601 - 1,650
1,651 - 1,700
1,701 - 1,750
1,751 - 1,800
1,801 - 1,850
1,851 - 1,900
1,901 - 1,950
1,951 - 2,000

2,001 - 2,250
2,251 - 2,500
2,501 - 2,750
2,751 - 3,000
3,001 - 3,500
3,501 - 4,000
4,001 - 4,500
4,501 - 5,000

More than 5,000
Our tie-break rule:   In the event that a single round number is announced with a qualifier such as "about" or "around" (e.g., "We received around 1,200 entries."), the prize will be awarded to the entrant who picked the range including that precise number, e.g., 551 - 600 wins if the announced range is "around 600.").  As of August, 2015, this rule is officially even more complicated than it's ever been, but at least it's consistent with what we actually do.